Spray Nozzles

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by irrig8r, Apr 15, 2008.

  1. irrig8r

    irrig8r LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,535

    Anyone using the new Rain Bird XPCN nozzles? I haven't tried them yet.... feedback?

    Also, the new Hunter adjustables... I heard from my distributor they recalled all the old ones before they released the new ones....

    So, are they better than RB VANs?

    Do the new Hunters have a matched precip rate (VANs don't even pretend to.)


    And has anyone tried the new Irrigation Direct adjustables? The price is right, and from what I gather they are made in the same factory as Irritrol PRO-VANS...

    http://www.irrigationdirect.com/products/db.asp?id=DSAN-8

    http://www.irritrol.com/pdf/sellsheet_provan.pdf
     
  2. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 47,999

    I have a few of the older design, which worked, but was 'clumsy' if you bought only the 1/4 arc nozzles, and had to use the piercing tool to add more 1/4 portions to the coverage.
     
  3. irrig8r

    irrig8r LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,535

    OTOH, looking at the Irritrol PRO-VAN specs and ID DSAN specs, they seem to have different precip/ flow characteristics...
     
  4. irrig8r

    irrig8r LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,535

    I was using those for a handful of jobs... they seemed really inconsistent to me.

    I actually like the RB 5 ft heads on 6" Xeripops. I use them where a landscape has mostly drip but needs a few pockets of spray heads for annuals, or shallow rooted groundcover around stepping stones for instance.

    Easy enough to run a parallel line dedicated to the XPs, and I like the fact that they can be moved a little once installed as a landscape grows and changes.

    I imagine they might be inconvenient to blow out if I lived in a climate where that was a requirement...
     
  5. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 47,999

    I would use them for the odd patch of turf, but could have used 5H or 5Q nozzles, and not much difference.
     
  6. irrig8r

    irrig8r LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,535

    duplicate...see below
     
  7. irrig8r

    irrig8r LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,535

    http://www.rainbird.com/drip/products/emission/XPCNDemo/index.htm

    This demo suggests edge to edge coverage, IOW, no overlap necessary, no head to head coverage, but full coverage edge to edge.

    I interpret that to mean that adjusted to 4 ft. radius, you can use 8 ft. spacing along one edge of a 4 ft. wide strip.

    Or 8 ft. spacing and full heads adjusted at 4 ft. radius, right down the middle of an 8 ft. wide planter.

    Or adjusted to 2 ft. radius, for a really narrow planter, 4 ft. spacing along one edge.
     
  8. jeffinsgf

    jeffinsgf LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 641

    I have XPCN's in 4' x 4' raised garden beds, and am quite pleased with their coverage. I have 2 of the quarter coverage heads placed in opposing corners of each bed. I couldn't quite buy into the full coverage by one nozzle -- but as it turns out, it might have been sufficient.

    They do cover the bed in a nearly perfect square, at exactly 4 feet. I don't even have enough overspray to get the mulch on the outside of the beds wet, but the soil in the box is uniformly moistened right to the edge.

    I know the pressure compensation is working, because I have two XPCN nozzles in each bed, each bed on a separate zone, on the same trunk line that serves zones where I run 4 PGP's with #10 nozzles (45 PSI & 20 GPM measured at the POC). No misting, no over-spray.

    I think they're a great tool.
     
  9. jeffinsgf

    jeffinsgf LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 641

    According to the RB propaganda, you can put the XPCN on Xeri-Pops, which would negate the need for a parallel line, wouldn't it?
     
  10. irrig8r

    irrig8r LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,535

    The reason I put them on a parallel line is to accomodate different watering frequencies and duration.

    For instance, a bed of impatiens requires more constant moisture than nearby shrubs and trees, but not as deep.
     

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