Spraying wood growth in ditches.

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by LHS Lawns, Jan 31, 2013.

  1. LHS Lawns

    LHS Lawns LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 253

    Anyone chemically controlling woody veg in ditches and if so what are you using that's enviromentally friendly/effective?

    We just had our ditches mowed on our farm that had about five years growth of some nasty trees and brush.

    We had to hire the work out because we aren't set up to cut the ditches.

    I am set up to spray and was thinking of using Crossbow which is triclopyr +2,4-D ester.

    Thanks
     
  2. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,062

    Do the ditches flow to public bodies of water or are they sediment control devices? You will need an NPDES permit if the water goes outside of your property.

    2,4-D amine and triclopyr amine are labeled for spraying bodies of water.
     
  3. LHS Lawns

    LHS Lawns LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 253

    They are drainage ditches that ultimately after many miles run to waters of the state.

    These ditches are only active during runoff/heavy rain events that drain farmland and then dry up until the next event.

    To be safe I was planning on spraying when the ditches were dry and no rain in the long range forecast.

    Whats the name of the brand that has the 2,4-D amine and Triclopyr amine? I know I could spray a generic form of Rodeo and be safe.

    Thanks
     
  4. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,062

    I think you need to buy the 2,4-D and triclopyr separate. Also, any application to a waterway such as a ditch falls under NPDES restrictions. How your state interprets those restrictions varies. I need to apply for a permit with the Department of Health not the DOA for any application to water. Can thank the tree huggers in the state of fruits and nuts for this. Previously, labeled applications to waterways were considered pesticide applications covered by the existing pesticide laws. Now they are considered pollutant discharges.
     

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