spring cleanup

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by Bingham Brothers, Feb 21, 2007.

  1. Bingham Brothers

    Bingham Brothers LawnSite Member
    Posts: 66

    I need a little help (ok a lot) on spring cleanup. I have two new commercial properties (banks) that I will need to clean up beds this spring. I need to know how and when to cut back plants-- looks like nothing was cut in the fall- there is a lot of ornamental grass among other plants. Do I cut all old dry growth back and how far? The snow is starting to melt and the beds are partially exposed and looking pretty bad.
  2. vale of paradise

    vale of paradise LawnSite Member
    Posts: 19

    You would clean the natural debris from the landscape. Now for the existing plants that are there. Take a look at where there is first for plants. Take pictures if you have to. If you are unsure of the maintaining of the plants/shrubs etc.. go to the internet and research the flowers/plants/shrubs. There is alot of sites that will give you plenty of information on how to maintain what this bank has.

    Some sites to check out gardnersnet.com, gardenweb.com, landscaping.about.com these are some sites. There are so many sites out there just start browsing. This will make you more prepared and more educated on what you are cleaning up.

    Good luck
  3. PSUturf

    PSUturf LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 663

    All old growth on herbaceous perennials should be cut back within a few inches of the ground before any new growth emerges. Ornamental grasses (as well as some other perennials) are usually left up through the winter because they are visually appealing. Woody ornamentals (shrubs) can be pruned at this time if needed. Late winter - early spring is a good time to do rejuvenational pruning (cutting back close to the ground) or maintenance pruning (shaping and controlling size).
  4. Uranus

    Uranus LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Mass
    Posts: 1,624

    Not only would I schedule the clean up early on you list because it is a bank but also so you can do your pruning without harming the plants. If it is just you doing the grass' I would get a small rope and wrap it around the base of the plant. Pull it tight and use some hedge trimmers to cut off old growth a few inches above the ground. The rope helps you keep it together so the grass doesn't go all over making you spend more time picking it up. IF you have a helper have him hold the grass together tightly about a ft above where your going to cut with the trimmers. Have him toss it into a barrel and go to the next plant. This method works pretty well and I've been doing it for years now.

    RICHIE K LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 647

    Good info is @ pallensmith the dude from the weather channel

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