Spring Pond Clean-outs

Discussion in 'Water Features' started by tadpole, Oct 29, 2010.

  1. Niagara Falls

    Niagara Falls LawnSite Member
    Posts: 149

    I have so many leaves in my pond that I had to put a screen in from of the skimmer, because the leaves would accumulate in the skimmer basket so thick, that it stopped the water flowing to the pump and there would be air bubbles coming from the biofalls.
    And because there was no movement of water by the pump, the water in the stream just overflowed the edges of the pond.....

    I can't decide when to actually shut it down, the temperatures for the next week range from 23F - 44F
    The long term forecast is above freezing until 4-5 December
     
  2. tadpole

    tadpole LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,216

    I feel that a client is entitled to the absolute best and most correct installation possible. If a 'contractor' thinks otherwise then they are, IMO, a disgrace to the industry.

    There are too many sub-par ponds being installed by individuals that have not taken the time or put out the effort to learn the real basic 'Whys'. Knowing the 'Whats' is only scratching the surface.

    For many of these, a slap on the face should be replaced with a kick in the a$$.

    I stand by my statement.
     
  3. tadpole

    tadpole LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,216

    Sometimes Skimmer nets or baskets may require emptying several times a day, but usually only during the fairly brief period of seasonal leaf drop.

    Putting a screen in front of the skimmer weir opening is defeating the purpose and function of the skimmer. The screen will also clog and prevent water flow, as I am sure you know, but more importantly, it allows the leaves to remain in the pond where they will settle to the bottom and, yep, eventually necessitate a Pond clean out.

    As to your winter shut down, I would have thought that you would have gotten more response when you posted this question in an earlier thread, but you didn't. Even though I have had zero experience with winter shut downs, I would think the this would really be a arbitrary decision as to the timing of the shut down. Below 40F bacterial action is almost completely ceased and the metabolic rate of the fish is very low. So, I would think the deciding factor would be the protection of the pump. As long as I was able to maintain water flow, I would keep the system running.
     
  4. Stillwater

    Stillwater LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,796

    Ya, I feel for ya niagara we screen some of ours, we do shut downs after leaf season and before a solid freeze when we can pick out all the leaf that has escaped the skimmers and sunk. I live part of the year on the vineyard and have a bird issue I can keep the seagulls clambake debris off my dock using streamer's and wind socks and flags but they find my pond and drop all kinds of crab bodies, razor clam shells and steamers along with this red and blue unidentifiable gooish muck so I got figure out a way to prevent this. Wind socks streamers and flags around my pond is not a option
     
  5. tadpole

    tadpole LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,216

    Where exactly are you located, Stillwater. It sounds like a NE coastal area. Don't know about the red/blue muck (sounds like some really weird stuff), but the clam shells will keep your Alkalinity up as they slowly dissolve and buffer your pH.
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2010
  6. Stillwater

    Stillwater LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,796

    Martha's vineyard- I think the muck is some type of berries they vomit or crap up if it is not cleaned up in time it hardens in the sun and then you need a hose and scraper
     
  7. Niagara Falls

    Niagara Falls LawnSite Member
    Posts: 149

    We get that blue/red guk here also. I', told that it is a certain type of berry that birds, probably gulls, eat and they don't digest it.......similar to humans and peanuts.
     
  8. tadpole

    tadpole LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,216

    Sounds real enticing (NOT!). Every geographical area has it's quirky problems when it comes to Ponds. Down here we get leaf drop twice a year. Right now it's most of the deciduous trees and Oak acorns, come Spring it will be pine needles and Oak leaves and tree pollen, LOTS of tree pollen.
     
  9. tadpole

    tadpole LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,216

    The following are photos taken this morning of my display Pond which, as I previously stated, has not had a clean-out of any degree since Spring of 2006.

    The first photo is a shot of the 3 foot depth area with 2 areas marked for enlargement. The following 2 photos are enlargements of these areas.

    What you see are a few Willow leaves, maybe a twig or two, various sizes of gravel, small cobbles, and sand, but there is no sign of an organic sediment accumulation. Even after almost 5 years, this Pond does not warrant a clean-out.

    HPIM0379 bright insets.jpg

    HPIM0379 crop1.jpg

    HPIM0379 bright crop2.jpg
     
  10. Stillwater

    Stillwater LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,796

    looks clean to me.......
     

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