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spring runoff & a-scape ponds

Discussion in 'Water Features' started by Bill M., Apr 16, 2002.

  1. Bill M.

    Bill M. LawnSite Member
    Posts: 7

    Customer has a location where they would to have an Aquascape Pond. However, they would like to place it so that a natural seasonal run-off is incorporated into the design. i.e., the pond is placed in an area through which a seasonal spring runs (April-June). I have my doubts about this. How would the underground flow affect the liner? How would the in/outflow of foreign water affect the biology? Something tells me this is not adviseable but I needed to ask the question. thanks
  2. Stonehenge

    Stonehenge LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Midwest
    Posts: 1,277


    As I understand it they like to have a closed system, with nothing coming in or going (except for whatever rainwater we can't help).

    That being said, I know there's somebody here that has done what you suggest and from what I recall the water feature came out fine.

    I hope whoever did that (one of the deutekoms?) will pipe up.
  3. dan deutekom

    dan deutekom LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 424

    Yes I have done it and it has worked out fine. One thing that I did was before laying in the liner we put in some Big "O" drainage pipe and let it drain to a lower area because I to was concerned with ground water lifting the liner. In 2 years I have not seen any water drain from it and the liner has not lifted. This pond gets a lot of water in spring and during heavy rain storms. It dosn't take much more maintenance than normal closed ponds. There is no filter but the water is pumped up to a height of about 40' to a small stream ending in a small water fall of about 3-4'. This seems to be enough to keep algae at a acceptable level. The biggest problem is with leaves in fall.

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