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Sprinkler placement near roads

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by Chillenk20, Sep 18, 2006.

  1. Chillenk20

    Chillenk20 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 6

    I'm currently installing an irrigation system in my yard. I have about 200 ft. worth of roadfront yard to irrigate. Since the state owns approx. 15' of right of way I'm assuming that your not supposed to place any heads within that area. As a result of placing heads(rotors) out of the 15' right of way, you cannot get head to head coverage obviously, and on top of that you have to set the throw so that it sprays into the road when it is perpendicular to the road in order to ensure the total area along the road gets water. If I do that however, people will be pissed when they drive by and the side of there car gets hit with water. Just curious as to what you guys do in these situations.
  2. Lawnworks

    Lawnworks LawnSite Fanatic
    from usa
    Posts: 5,407

    I would install them 1-2' off of the street.
  3. Unless you are prohibited by local code, i would not worry about placing heads close to road.

    I would however understand that I wouldn't expect them to repair anything they break while fixing or improving road.

    We run into this locally a lot with small parking strips. Most cities, hold the homeowner for maintenance of that strip. So, they don't say anything if irrigation is installed. However, if a city crew has to do some work, they break a pipe, it is understood that they are under no obligation to repair. Most of the time though, city workers will do the repair themselves. Boils down to less headaches.
  4. PurpHaze

    PurpHaze LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,496

    Like others have already stated go ahead and install them in the easement. However, install sprinklers that will hold up to cars parking over them and design your lines in such a manner that you can "retreat" them in the event the city comes through and curbs the street.
  5. Critical Care

    Critical Care LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,654

    Agree, install them in the easement and plan on several more zones just to water that area with some fixed sprays... unless if you're running line larger than an inch diameter.
  6. Dirty Water

    Dirty Water LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,799

    Why sprayheads?

    I prefer to lay my zones out perpindicular and not parrelel to the easement. That way if the city decides to widen the road and takes out the last head of each zone you can cap the laterals and move the heads slighty to fix the spacing.

    This is a quicky MS paint example, Spacing would probably be more thought out in real life :)

  7. Critical Care

    Critical Care LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,654

    I would surely go with your idea Jon as long as there wasn't a sidewalk or anything else between the easement and the rest of the property. But yeah, if it's all one big piece of turf, pull out the stream rotors.
  8. Dirty Water

    Dirty Water LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,799

    Ahem, PGP's, streamrotors belong in the garbage bin :D

    I gather there isnt a sidewalk from the original post.
  9. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 47,694

    With no sidewalks, and especially with a curved road, a line of full-circle heads set a distance from the road, can cover everything to the edge, without tossing water high enough to annoy any passing cars. Space them head to head, or even closer.
  10. Dirty Water

    Dirty Water LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,799

    Yep, Often when someone is unconfortable with heads and pipe on a easement we will space heads closer than head to head just off the easement border.

    And the grass stays green.

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