Standers?

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by allstar, Sep 6, 2003.

  1. allstar

    allstar LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 282

    I see quite a bit written about this type of mower and see alot of them being used by various landscaping companies around town.What are the main reasons people use these mowers?Are they more maneuverable and faster?Do they cut better? Do most of you guys(experienced business owners with fairly large operations) own one or more of these machines?Thanks.
     
  2. I own a 36” and a 52” Stander. I think the 36” Stander is just about the best mower you can get for a back-yard duty. Frankly, the quality of the cut is good but not great. There are many reasons to use them, but the main reason is they’re quick (not fast). You can use them on large open areas, but full-blown ZTR’s are much faster. However, if you have a lot of obstacles, tight congested areas, or steep (up to about 25-degree) slopes, it’d be tough to out-produce a Stander. They cost about 2/3rds of the same size ZTR.

    The Wright Stander has a fixed deck that some view as a liability. But it’s been my experience that they’re less likely to scalp and edge-gouge than floating deck mowers. The main drawback to a fixed deck is its limited range in height of cut.

    I don’t know a lot about the Great Dane or the John Deere versions. Other than they’re longer and have floating decks. Before you buy either, DEMO them all!

    Pro:

    Quick to turn makes them the fastest mower around obstacles.
    Short, so they get in and out of tight spaces (like trailers), saving weed-whack time.
    Very low center of gravity makes them the best ZTR for hill-side duty.
    Pop “wheelys” at the drop of a hat so you can jump over rocks, knobs, etc.
    Low cost for a ZTR.
    Light weight so they don’t leave as heavy of a track on soft soil.
    Fixed deck is less likely to scalp and edge-gouge (as long as you pay attention).
    Standing operation allows you to absorb shocks with your legs and feet (as the Lord intended) rather than your back when you’re sitting.
    View above the deck makes it easy to see exactly where you’re cutting and what your wheels are doing.
    Simple machine very easy to change blades, belts, oil, filters, grease, etc.

    Con:

    Short wheelbase makes them terrible about skidding when you go straight down a hill.
    Quality of cut is not as good as many ZTRs.
    Not as fast as ZTRs in large open areas.
    Jumping curbs is limited to about 4” high without help.
    Fixed deck has limited range in cut height and is more difficult to change.
    Quick to turn makes them seem too “twichy” around obstacles.
    Standing makes your head a real target around shrubs and trees.
    Engine and muffler is exposed to damage by low-hanging tree branches.
    Limited dealers carrying them in some areas, making prices less competitive and parts harder to find.
     
  3. mowerman90

    mowerman90 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,491

    Get a Wright Sentar, the best of both worlds. I've got a 61" 25HP Kawi. You can stand OR sit. Plus, it has an adjustable heigth fully floating deck that for me at least, gives a beautiful cut.
     
  4. Turfdude

    Turfdude LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,900

    Great post Blue!

    We currently have 2 - 48 units. Both are in their 3rd year w/ about 1500 hrs on each. The biggest downside is operator error. Because they are quick on lawns up to 10,000 sq ft as compared to w/b's, many operators get lazy and go too fast while making zero turns. THey have a lot of torque and that combined with being a little "twitchy", make for bad turf tears. We'll be replacing them next season w/ 2 belt 48's either Bobcat or eXmark ECS. If you're a solo operator, or run only one crew - they are excellent machines. However, when you can't be on site all of the time (my case), you will probably be a little upset when you do a visit on one of your properties and see some of the poor judgement calls the laborers have used.
     
  5. sheppard

    sheppard LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 542

    Allstar, great question.

    Blue steel won't steer you wrong. He knows what he's talking about.

    I've had my 52" Stander for about 2 years now- has about 400 hours on it. I demo'd everthing Tallahassee had to offer: Exmark, JD, Scag, Snapper, Husq.

    Picked the Stander because I was not as tired at the end of the day as I was on a seated mower. After I had it for a few weeks I was more comfortable with my selection.

    Nothing handles a slope like a Stander!

    Cordially,
    Sheppard
     
  6. Planet Landscaping

    Planet Landscaping LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 607

    Love mine 6123
     
  7. GSL 23

    GSL 23 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 42

    I have a 52 inch Wright Stander and I like it alot. I am a female and the stander is easy to operate of course it does tear a little turf but if you are slow in turning you should not have that problem. My boyfriend and I run this business. Befor we had the stander I would only blow down walks and only use the 21 inch mower. Now I am the stander queen.

    GSL
     
  8. Shady Brook

    Shady Brook LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Indiana
    Posts: 1,517

    Bluesteel gave as good of a presentation of a stander as one could give in my opinion. I have a 36, and with the narrow tires on this unit, it is more apt to tear turf, and slide on hills then it's bigger brothers. I enjoy riding mine, although one of my workers mans it most of the time, however I don't know if I would get another.

    For me the biggest downside is the cut quality. If I have tall grass, or any moisture content, the deck plugs almost instantly, and the chunks start flying. It does not really grind up the grass in dry conditions, which necesitates alot of extra cutting, bagging, and or blowing of lawns to get an acceptable cut.

    Demo one, but do so when you have some good growth so you know how it will perform when it matters most.

    Have fun
    Jay
     
  9. Envy Lawn Service

    Envy Lawn Service LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,062

    I'm sorry but I think too much is being made of the slope performance of stand on Z's. I'm not saying this to make anyone mad. I'm just saying I don't believe it to the point that I will be talking around next week to set up a demo on one.

    I can maybe see where they might do better than some sit ons crossing a slope. But otherwise I just can't see it. I can mow up and down slopes I don't think you could ever get up in the first place on a stand on.

    Now don't go bashing me, like I said...I'm getting a demo.
     
  10. allstar

    allstar LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 282

    Wow,you guys are awesome!Very little B.S. on this website...just good,solid and useful information.Thanks so much for the help. Jim
     

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