Start time on the clock vs. off the clock

Discussion in 'Employment' started by Deetapp, Apr 28, 2012.

  1. Deetapp

    Deetapp LawnSite Member
    Posts: 5

    What is the industry standard for when to start the clock, break times and end time. In my situation, usually my guys come to my house first, load the truck and drive to the clients house. Some days they meet me there.

    Do I pay them for the driving time to the client?

    What about going to get breakfast at a drivethru after they pick up the truck vs. going on their own time before they get to my house.

    I don't want to be a stickler about these things, but the time adds up!
  2. grandview (2006)

    grandview (2006) LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,466

  3. BOSS LAWN 2343

    BOSS LAWN 2343 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 407

    Time does add up, I start running their clock when they show up. Whatever they do until their day is up, is paid. Driving, lunch, breaks , etc..
  4. nepatsfan

    nepatsfan LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,142

    My guys start when they arrive at the shop. When they get back to the shop is when their day is over. We substract a half hour for lunch every day. I used to let them work through lunch until I find out they were putting in for working through but still stopping for lunch. Now everyone has to take a lunch and it is deducted. I would say that stopping for breakfast would be a no with us. If you want a coffee or breakfast then get up 10 minutes earlier and stop on your way in, if you can't do that then you don't want it that bad.
  5. McFarland_Lawn_Care

    McFarland_Lawn_Care LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,404

    Ditto @ Nepatsfan. I give them the choice of working through lunch (sandwich on the mower) or taking 1/2 hr break and stopping at a nearby store. Legally you can deduct 1/2 hr lunch break but you have to give them that option. Otherwise you have to pay from the time you tell them to show up until you tell them they can leave. If they chill around the shop after you said they can leave talking and shooting the bull that's fine, but it's not on your time. If they are taking too many breaks and going to breakfast just hold a quick meeting and explain your expectations. As far as driving goes yes, they are "at work" for you and need to be paid. It helps me sometimes to try to think of myself as an employee and what would seem fair or unfair to me.

    Posts: 1,343

    Dedicated time in the a.m. until the truck rolls back in in the afternoon. We deduct 1/2 hoir for lunch. I try to have trucks set and running in the morning so they leave the shop at their start time. I hate mornings when we spend a half hour hooking up trailers and loading equip, it for some reaon irritates me to no end. I tend to put trust into my guys to do the right thing with their work day. They can definitely stick it to you if your going fo bust on them for minutes each day. I will also try to find them at times during lunch simply to pay for it and give them a lift for the day. Also gives me an opportunity to review the first half of the day and go over expectations for the rest of the afternoon. Good luck to all this season.
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  7. gcbailey

    gcbailey LawnSite Silver Member
    from WV
    Posts: 2,574

  8. Really need to find out what LOCAL STATE LAW says. But as far as federal work law, the second they clock in they are no longer on there time but yours. Doesn't matter if you have 45 minutes to job site from shop or 2 minutes, they are on the clock.

    Now to solve this problem and depending how far the work is spread, you can limit the down time by requiring your labors to show up at first job or central location and then using modern options, have them clock in at that point like construction job sites do.

    Sucks, but really treat the employee the way you would expect to be treated......all those service industries such as sears, roto rooter.......their employees are on the clock the second they clock in and stay on the clock till they clock out. If you are giving your time, you expect to be compensated for it too. Dont be a cheapskate, will come back and bite you.

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