Stein Property Services

Discussion in 'Original Pictures Forum' started by Steiner, Jan 13, 2012.

  1. crichardson

    crichardson LawnSite Member
    Posts: 96

    Awesome, thank you so much.
     
  2. Steiner

    Steiner LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 407

  3. Richard Martin

    Richard Martin LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 14,700

    I'll be honest, the way the sidewalk is tilted would bug the daylights out of me. I can understand it running lengthwise up the slope but it should have been level across the sidewalk. Yes, it is more work and grading but like you say "Attention to detail". I believe you dropped the ball on that one.
     
  4. Steiner

    Steiner LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 407

    Richard thanks for the comment.

    I think the picture is deceptive, the walk only slopes about a 1/2-1" over four foot from left to right. I was going to leave it flat but I wanted to clear all melt water and ice from the walk for safety as quickly as possible.

    ICPI specs usually dictate a 1/4" per foot minimum cross slope for pavements and I followed ICPI specs to the letter as always.

    Question for you though: Which picture makes it look grossly over-sloped?

    Chris
     
  5. Richard Martin

    Richard Martin LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 14,700

    Curves and more curves.
     
  6. BckYrdLmbrJk

    BckYrdLmbrJk LawnSite Member
    Posts: 240

    Beautiful work. I like your designs as well. The sketch-up stuff looks very time consuming. I'm not sure if it was already asked but how do you charge/cover for your design work?

    I deal with people all the time who would happily have me put time, effort, and money into doing their design work, and then do it themselves or have someone else do it if they thought my quote was too high. Lately I only do blueprints for intensive jobs after I feel as though the job is secure.

    I really like your idea of taking a photo and lightening up the opacity and sketching over it. That would work really well for me and be quick and easy. Especially on a tablet. Brilliant! You really seem to have it together and I applaud your attention to detail. My high school tech/shop teacher does some work on the side and he has a reputation for doing the crappiest work in town. Ha. Also, not really a ford guy, but I like your rig with the dump trailer. Very sharp/clean looking. Keep up the great work!
     
  7. Steiner

    Steiner LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 407

    Also forgot to share the new addition to the fleet this year, after years of saving and waiting till the right time.

    IMG_2529.jpg
     
  8. Armsden&Son

    Armsden&Son LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,357

    Just checked out your thread tonight for the first time... Love it! I am a solo op myself and while I do offer mowing and maintenance, I have a passion for hardscapes and installs just like you... I am Upstate, Waaaaaay Upstate, and I am lucky enough to have worked at a Bobcat dealership(still put in a couple days here and there) The MT's are awesome! super strong and they can tackle a lot! Don't forget to grease those rollers! There are two fitting on them! haha
     
  9. Armsden&Son

    Armsden&Son LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,357

    P.S Looked at your photo's. Really cool... My favorite was the one of that black doggie.. Lab?
     
  10. Steiner

    Steiner LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 407

    Armsden:

    Thanks for the compliment. It was funny i was just talking to my wife about you and what you posted on lawn site since we were up in old forge this weekend. (Ate at Frankie's and had a few beers at Sister's Bistro after hiking Bald Mountain.) I told her I appreciated your posts from that area of the world.

    Glad you looked at the photos. I appreciate the comments. The dog is a mutt as far as I know. Neighbor's dog from Oswego.

    Thanks for the info on the mt. I bought the Bobcat because the dealer is so close. I will watch those rollers.

    Backyard: Design work is never profitable in my experience. I use the iPad and sketchbook pro for quick sketches I usually just wrap the hourly rate into the final estimate. I really don't bring out the big guns (sketchup) unless I know the client is on board. I am getting better of "getting the sense," of who sees value in a real design. With that said, I worked in a consultant role/designer on a large pool scape out of town for a family friend. I did make money but it was not really worth the calls, meetings, travel time and hassle. It was good experience. I use design as an exercise to gain experience and work with people. I think it helps me sell. I create relationships with designs. Not much money in it, at least here in Syracuse.
     

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