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Steps for Starting Lawn Mowing Business

Discussion in 'Starting a Lawn Care Business' started by kinglin, Jun 4, 2008.

  1. kinglin

    kinglin LawnSite Member
    from Midwest
    Posts: 12

    Looking for a brief list of steps that will prepare one for starting their own lawn company.

    Hypothetical Company: Have $15,000 to spend on new company. Does lawn cutting, trimming, and blowing. $25, small yards. No equipment, nothing. Want to mow first lawn, May 1st, 2009. What should be done and when.

    1. Contracts, listing as an LLC, when to buy equipment, etc.

    THEGOLDPRO LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,223

    step 1. buy small used walkbehind mower. trimmer/blower also get a small 4x8 triailer.

    step 2. start slowely gaining new clients.

    step 3. buy new equpment as your business grows dont buy all new crap at once hoping to succede then you fail and have 20k in new equipment.

    make sure to keep you're overhead low and your profits high.
  3. MowHouston

    MowHouston LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,012

    Don't worry about your LLC at first. Work as a sole proprietor but get your DBA. Get general liability insurance, commercial insurance on your truck, possible insure your equipment, especially new equipment. Check with a CPA to know your responsibilities as a tax paying business owner so you dont screw yourself over with the IRS.

    Start exploring your avenues of advertising. Door hangers, post cards in the mail, build a website and advertise online, etc. Try to figure out what would be the best option for you. Personally, in a large city, I have a website and spend $15 a day on google when I want customers. Brought me 11 new customers this week. You might live in a hick town and google/website wont work so well for you. Explore your best options

    Equipment is the obvious. Get commercial grade. I recommend used equipment until you know that you're gonna stick this business out.

    Oh yes, and finally, pack a sack lunch. You can save yourself about $800 in the year. Plus, you'll probably be healthier :)

    Good luck.

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