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Stihl 192T vs 200T

Discussion in 'Tree Service Equipment' started by Guest, Nov 20, 2009.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest
    Posts: 0

    First thing to do upon buying a 200T is to pull the screen, then readjust the carb to keep the rpm's correct. Power gain/reduced cut times= about 8%.
     
  2. Guest

    Guest Guest
    Posts: 0

    You'd be wrong. My wood ported 3120 has twin front facing tubes, no arrestor. (I won't let any of my new saws be built this way.) Though it's never caught a tree on fire, it will get em glowing, easily.

    I work in residential areas, and fire danger is pretty much non existant, so don't worry about it. But I do prefer to have screens if possible. Not on climb saws, though. not worth the extra effort to design them in.
     
  3. Guest

    Guest Guest
    Posts: 0

    i have the Ts 192 and i have had no problems with it at all. Just keep the chain sharp! i have topped some pretty serious trees with it and it had no problems. If the 200 wasnt so much money, i would buy that either for a spare or just to have. But the Ts 192 is fine and safe.
     
  4. Guest

    Guest Guest
    Posts: 0

    We use Stihl 192T's as our primary bucket/climbing saw but have been tossing around the idea of getting a 200T. I've only talked to one other guy that has used the 200T so I'd like to get some more input before I spend the extra $$$! The 200 is almost double the cost of the 192 which seems kind of high for only a 5.1cc gain. Anyone have advise? And no, we won't go with any other brands. We are in a very rural part of Colorado with only 2 small engine repair/parts places within 1/2 hour drive and they're both certified Stihl dealers. Thanks for any input!

    192T:
    30.1 cc (1.8 cu. in.)
    1.3 kW (1.7 bhp)

    200T:
    35.2 cc (2.15 cu. in.)
    1.6 kW (2.1 bhp)
     
  5. Guest

    Guest Guest
    Posts: 0

    Some of my "competitions" workers might need the closer hand grips so they can use the saw with the handcuffs still on! LMAO :laugh:
     
  6. Guest

    Guest Guest
    Posts: 0

    So.... back to the subject at hand(s). Can anyone weigh in on the original question?
     
  7. Guest

    Guest Guest
    Posts: 0

    I doubt a chainsaw has ever started a fire. But that's what we get for having politicians.

    I'm a big fan of Deregulation!
     
  8. Guest

    Guest Guest
    Posts: 0

    I just got/used my first 200T. There is a HUGE difference in the amount of power it has over the 192! I love the 192's and have used them for many years but had I known there was such a dramatic difference in speed I would have switched a long time ago. The only drawback I can say is that it cost nearly twice as much.

    Functionally the biggest difference I see is the on/off/choke switch is higher on the handle and has a bigger rocker which is fine except I'm used to the 192 and I keep inadvertently turning the saw off when I hit the chain brake. I'll get used to that quickly I'm sure!

    If your only using the saw occasionally and for small trims you might want to stick with the cheaper saw.
     
  9. Guest

    Guest Guest
    Posts: 0

    Seriously? You're still topping trees? How about reading up on the current procedures of tree trimming!!
     
  10. Guest

    Guest Guest
    Posts: 0

    I just bought one of each. If the money is not the only factor, get the 200T. It is simply more saw.

    None of our guys will run the 190T unless it is the only one available.

    Also, FWIW, I don't care for either, except as a high-work limbing saw, and even then not much. I prefer a saw with some bar reach myself.

    I'm a fairly good-sized guy, and I find both of the small saws to be one-hand saws only. Using two hands makes the saw difficult to maneuver, as the grip size is narrow and tight. It is almost as if you have both hands handcuffed right in front of you. But, that being said, when you really need a one-hand saw, they are the ones to have. They are easy to control that way, and have enough juice to get the job done.

    Also, for the money, you might also consider one of the extendable pole saws. We also just bought two of the HT 131 saws and I prefer them to either of the two small saws for in tree work. On the ground, not so much, for obvious reasons, but up in the trees, they work great.
     

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