Stihl 36 v cordless?

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by seabee24, May 8, 2011.

  1. seabee24

    seabee24 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 619

    Btw....if there are any "big boy" landscapers on here.....I personally have bid projects that required "going green". Things like propane mowers were a bid requirement, this could be one of those deals too.

    I was told the still batteries will have a good warrantee. A large landscaper in my area here purchased 30 of them to try.
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  2. ecurbthims

    ecurbthims LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 468

    you can re-charge your batteries with your truck while your driving,working etc ,depending on your route its possible you can have fresh batteries all the time .Somebody would be smart to make a trimmer rack that recharged a battery trimmer when the trimmer is sitting in it .
     
  3. seabee24

    seabee24 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 619

    thats not a half bad idea actually. I dont know why so many landscapers dont like change, plow guys are even wrost off.

    last year i picked up a busy commercial account, that had 16 parking islands on it. Well because the curbs were so high, and the parking lot was filled with doctors really nice cars. i told the crew to shut the 21 inch mower off, before they took it off the parking island, to avoid a rock getting picked up and doign some damage. IT became very clear very fast that pull starting an old 21 inch mower 16 times in less than 30 mins, just wasnt effective.

    I had a customer that is part owner in the company "WORKs" - he let us try a 19 inch 24 v push mower....its the $hit. we charge the battery 1 time per week, and cut at least 20,000 total sq feet with it. Good power, bags, mulches, discharges, push down on the key, and pull the lever and it starts right up. We have a retention pond that has 5 feet of retaining wall all the way around with no service ramp....this machine weighs like 50 lbs...we hand it down. i have a power inverter in my truck, so if we need to we can charge it on the fly..i also considered buying a second battery since this machine is one of only a few, that have removal batteries....btu i never needed it

    now he is going to let us try the new 36 volt model... im hoping that it to is just as good

    So why not try an electric weed wip? If i told you that you burn on average $120-$150 per year in fuel..... plus now the carbs are crap so they need replacment yearly..... why not try this?
     
  4. Patriot Services

    Patriot Services LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 12,533

    This will be the future. Battery tech will improve. Rigs of the future will have solar panels on the roof. Running to rapid charging racks for the handhelds. The Hustler electric ZTR will be super once they can get the run time up. Watch for more CNG powered equipment.
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  5. rlitman

    rlitman LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,518

    Is your experience with Lithium, Ni-Cd, or Ni-MH batteries.
    Ni-Cd doesn't last in my experience either. Ni-MH isn't much better, except for the fact that each one holds more charge.
    Lithium ion batteries can typically outlast a Ni-Cd in charge cycles 20 fold. Stihl claims that after 100 charges, the battery still has 80% of the original energy storage capacity. Still, $150 per battery for the small one, or $260 for about double the capacity in the same size, it's pretty tough to swallow.

    I saw the hedge trimmer at my dealer last year. It looks like they're rolling out a whole bunch of new stuff in the US, including a blower, two string trimmers and even a chainsaw. Looks like there's even a mower available in Europe that uses these batteries. The belt pack to hold the battery to take the weight off your hands is a neat idea. Still, not my cup of tea quite yet, but if you're the early adopter type, it may be for you.
     
  6. Patriot Services

    Patriot Services LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 12,533

    Hmmmm and guess which country is sitting on the largest supply of lithium. Hint, it sound and smells like "crap in a can".
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  7. rlitman

    rlitman LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,518

    I recall reading about that last year. I took a look at wikipedia, and they say that the worlds largest deposits of Lithium are in Bolivia, and that while old Russian studies indicate that Afghanistan may have reserves as large as Bolivia, there have been no discoveries there to date. Makes for some neat conspiracy theories, but who really knows.
     
  8. Jake4551

    Jake4551 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 111

    Had similar problem with some Stihl blowers, dealer kept telling me it was the gas. Went a long time with the problem, then it dawned on me it might be the oil I was using, despite the fact I thought I was using the best, Stihl. Turns out it was the oil. Changed to opti synthetic never had a problem since.

    http://www.amazon.com/Interlube-Int...1?ie=UTF8&s=home-garden&qid=1305295592&sr=1-1

    There are things that I never had a problem with, such as using the Stihl oil in my chainsaws, BUT with the EPA requiring different designs on carbs, possibly that oil didn't go well with the design of the Stihl Blower carb. Just a thought.
     
  9. rlitman

    rlitman LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,518

    Stihl has three grades of 2 cycle oil. Which one were you using (you can tell which is which, by the color of the bottles).
     
  10. Jake4551

    Jake4551 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 111

    I always try to buy the so called best oil available at the time. At that time I was using the white and silver full synthetic, however prior to that being released I had always used their standard orange bottle. I am not 100% sure that I would have had a problem if I would have just stuck with the orange bottle. The synthetic says it degrades after 20 days or so, not sure if that is a great idea.
    Not trying to give the idea that the oil degrades after 20 days in a tank, but light must effect it to some degree?
     

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