Stihl Carbide tipped saw chain

Discussion in 'General Industry Discussions' started by ed2hess, Mar 8, 2013.

  1. Benfield

    Benfield LawnSite Member
    Posts: 21

    Its is not worth buying. Sounds to me like you need a MS461 Rock Saw if you are going to cut rocks.
     
  2. CL&T

    CL&T LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 493

    Understood, but the OP is talking about repair work of leaking lines. Those boulders didn't grow there after the pipe was originally installed so if they weren't a problem then they shouldn't be now. Smaller stuff might have been pushed out of the way by the plow or in with the trencher backfill and should be removed. Roots I can see being a problem.
     
  3. whiffyspark

    whiffyspark LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,119

    I use a pruning blade on a sawzall. Blades make all the difference
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  4. agrostis

    agrostis LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,307

    I passed that carbide tipped chain link on to a machinist. He said that you couldn't sharpen those carbide tip's with a hand file, he also said he was going to try one.

    For cutting root's i use the right tool for the job, a dewalt battery operated sawzall with these blade's.

    http://www.milwaukeetool.com/accessories/cutting/48-00-1301
     
  5. CL&T

    CL&T LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 493

    I've used a pruning blade like that and they are good but not in soil. They'll dull in short order like any other wood blade. That's why I mentioned that carbide tipped Sawzall blade.
     
  6. ed2hess

    ed2hess LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,311

    Another good idea .....didn't realize they made those. Much better
    than th echain saw..should be less costly
     
  7. rlitman

    rlitman LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,559

    You're right of course, and I have used those carbide tipped sawzall blades (Freud Demo Demon) with great success on other projects (I liked them so much, I cut out a piece and welded it to a blade shank, so I can use one with my Fein tool).

    But they're not really appropriate for green wood. Look at how open the tooth space is on that pruning blade. You need that to remove the fibers from cutting live wood (a chainsaw gets around chip removal in a better way, but that's not really a good idea in dirt).

    What you need (but does not exist), is a carbide tipped pruning blade. Something with carbide teeth, but a tooth design made for green wood, not dried construction materials. If I really needed to do this a lot, I'd probably modify some of these by removing every other tooth.
     
  8. ed2hess

    ed2hess LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,311

    Can either of you guys give me an internet pointer for those blades?
     
  9. CL&T

    CL&T LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 493

    I think we did. Go back and look at those posts.
     
  10. rlitman

    rlitman LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,559

    Here's the one I was talking about (same idea):
    http://www.diablotools.com/recip-wood.html

    The carbide tipped is available in a 12" blade, but while 6TPI is nice and coarse for demolition, it is still a little fine for green wood.
     

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