Stihl-hs-45 Hedge Trimmer

Discussion in 'Mechanic and Repair' started by Eakern & Dog, Aug 3, 2006.

  1. Eakern & Dog

    Eakern & Dog LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 431

    My kill switch stopped working. Any one here ever replace this switch or did you just take it to a repair shop ? So, far it still works, but I have to use the choke to power it off.
     
  2. iluvscag

    iluvscag LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 741

    JUst use the choke to kill it. Fast and easy.
     
  3. Jim@MilkyWay

    Jim@MilkyWay LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 472

    Spray it with some Fluid Film. I have had a lot of success using WD-40 and others; PB may be good to try. The whole trick is to get clean and lube juice to the contacts inside the housing. I have even taken some switches apart to access contacts. What is it worth to go this route? Not much if you make frequent trips to parts supply and that particular switch es no mucho dinero.
     
  4. MowerMedic77

    MowerMedic77 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,164

    Are you mechanically inclined? If so get the new part and install it, but if not then I would not spend time to much time pulling it apart and losing other parts inside the handle. Do not choke your equipment to shut it down :hammerhead:
     
  5. Jim@MilkyWay

    Jim@MilkyWay LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 472

    Absolutely Dead ON!!!
    Got a new toy at work today and just had to go play a little. I subsequently got pulled away from the forum while typing a response to this thread, and forgot to include that in text. Choking engine to stall is a serious bad. You are straining the carb, washing cylinder walls with raw fuel, and probably a dozen other negatives that I can't cough up right now.
     
  6. bill w

    bill w LawnSite Member
    from Va.
    Posts: 198

    On a two stroke engine, there is no washing cylinder walls with raw fuel...it is a mix. I would like to know how the carb gets strained. My concern would be eventual build-up of deposits in the exhaust port and on the spark plug.
     
  7. Eakern & Dog

    Eakern & Dog LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 431

    Yes, I feel confident enough to try and change the switch if the switch is bad. I will try to clean the contact first and see if that solves the problem. Thanks for letting me know not to choke it to shut it down.
     
  8. Jim@MilkyWay

    Jim@MilkyWay LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 472

    I will concede only the point that excessive fuel drawn into carb is mixed, in this case.
    When the choke is closed off, do you agree that, until engine stops, it will draw air from the path of least resistance? That could be around throttle shaft bushings, as one example. The more this occurs, the more grit gets sucked into carb/engine with air. Granted nothing dire will happen in the short haul, but,,,.
    On an aside, the perfectly good engine my step son abandoned needs a carb, as the throttle shaft will move a full eighth inch inside it's bushing. That is just from an unchecked condition of constant engine surge while idling.
    There is another reason, or two.
     
  9. bill w

    bill w LawnSite Member
    from Va.
    Posts: 198


    Jim,

    You can start the engine with the choke engaged without worrying about grit, can't you? The choke butterflies that I am familiar with have a hole that allows air access to the carb throat...otherwise there would be no air mix to allow combustion.
     
  10. lawnmaniac883

    lawnmaniac883 LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,613

    You also may want to take the top shroud off and make sure the wires are connected to the ignition coil. This happened to my fs100rx trimmer yesterday. Pulled the plug to make sure it was in good condition, put it back in and proceeded to cut 4 lawns in a row then it wouldnt shut off. three screws taken out, removed the cover to find when the dealer replaced ignition coil they went over the spark plug lead with the kill switch wire. Reattached and it works fine. BTW I choked then engine to turn it off but only because I knew what had happened. Like the others have said though, dont choke off engines on a regular basis.
     

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