Stone veneer

Discussion in 'Hardscaping' started by Captains Landscape, Aug 23, 2007.

  1. Captains Landscape

    Captains Landscape LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 333

    Don't see much discussion about this, I think the general consensus is it's better left for brick masons. Does anyone have any tips or suggestions. I'm talking about full dimensional veneer, not that thin sh*t. I'm experimenting at my house and having trouble. :cry:
     
  2. paponte

    paponte LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,366

    We don't do alot of natural stone veneer if thats what your talking about, but we do alot of what you consider "thin sh*t. Great money maker, and you don't need a whole crew of guys either. We use Eldorado Stone and Owens Corning. Takes some time and a little patience, but the end results look great IMO.
     
  3. leaflandscape

    leaflandscape LawnSite Member
    Posts: 241

    Are you talking cultured stone or natural stone veneers like ledgerock. We do a fair amount of masonry work, and the thin stuff holds up just as well as the thicker stone to traffic and doesn't have quite the weight when installing.
     
  4. Captains Landscape

    Captains Landscape LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 333

    i'm sure there is a time and place for the manufactured cultured stone. I'm in the practice phase on this. I think there is something special about having the full size veneer in a project. Even though the "thin" and "full" should look the same at completion, it just feels more gratifying to have the "real thing".
    Thin cut natural stone veneer is a great product to keep the industry competitive against other options the homeowner has. The easy application drops the masons labor involvement in order to keep the price reasonable. It's a shortcut in the industry to make our life easier. But there is something to be said about not taking the shortcut.....know what I mean.
    The veneer is 3"-6" thick, mosaic. I'm going masonry to masonry, non-cavity build. I cant get the placement right. I'm trying to get the joints to have a "over grouted" look. Are people using wedges and supports, then going back and filling the joints after the course is completed? Hints...tips...comments?
     
  5. Captains Landscape

    Captains Landscape LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 333

    examples......

    Picture 2.jpg

    23.JPG.jpg
     
  6. paponte

    paponte LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,366

    What type pf mortar are you using? and to what mixture? Takes a little getting used to making a workable mix if your not used to working with mortar all the time, also weather will play a role in it as well. Adding lime will give you more of a paste mix and will hold your pieces alot better. We also use brick ties in almost all of our applications. For over mortared joints we normally go back with the pastry bag and fill in everything.
     
  7. Captains Landscape

    Captains Landscape LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 333

    Type S mortar w/ lime premixed. I want wider joints and I cant get the heavy pieces set without pushing out the bed joint. I'm thinking shims, but I was wondering what others do?
     
  8. Henry

    Henry LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 549

    I had the front of my house done with natural stone about 9 years ago. The masons used screws and wires to hold the large pieces in place until the mortar set. They could only do about 16 sf per day.
     
  9. Captains Landscape

    Captains Landscape LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 333

    Do you remember if there is a cavity between the house and the stone work? I'm assuming not, and there are weeps at the bottom. That's another problem I'm having, the area is small and I'm doing the corners first. I can get only a few stones up before I have to stop!
     
  10. bigviclbi

    bigviclbi LawnSite Senior Member
    from nj
    Posts: 894

    If the work in progress is yours I think it looks real good.
     

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