Strange yellowing

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by RAlmaroad, Apr 5, 2008.

  1. RAlmaroad

    RAlmaroad LawnSite Silver Member
    from SC
    Posts: 2,174

    Last October we put down 8-10 K of centipede sod. It was beautiful, did great through the winter but now is yellowing. Has had a little Dimension (Split) 0-0-7--No Nitrogen. Any idea what is going on? Generally yellowing is from over Nitrogen, over watering, clinch bugs. None of these are the problem. I'm thinking iron deficit.
    Any ideas what is happening.
    Thanks,
     
  2. bug-guy

    bug-guy LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 964

    any pictures?????
     
  3. RAlmaroad

    RAlmaroad LawnSite Silver Member
    from SC
    Posts: 2,174

    No just that typical yellowing that we see so much because of over-fertilizing. I'm thinking that sod farm shot it with Liquid Urea before cutting it and it stored the Nitrogen in the short roots just before it went dormant. I've got phone calls for all 4 of the people with the same thing. I'm in TN now and should go back in a couple of weeks to check. I generally do not fertilize centipede till well after greenup. Centipede only needs about 1/2lb in late spring and fall, plus it likes a more acid soil with PH of 5.5--6.5.
     
  4. LawnTamer

    LawnTamer LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,988

    I don't know anything about centipede grass, we have bluegrass, fescue and rye, but out here, I would suspect the opposite. After 5 months without nitrogen, most lawns would be yellowing.
     
  5. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 8,941

    Without having the results of a soil test in front of me, I would say iron and N deficiency would cause yellowing. Also, what is the K source in that Lesco blend you put down? If it was potassium chloride, that would explain plenty. Chlorides are salt and centipede does not like salt. I know I have mentioned this many times, but I do not care for root pruning herbicides on warm season grasses. Dimension is another root pruner. As is, centipede is the most shallow rooted out of all the grasses, it grows on the surface. I use simazine and hit grassy weeds with Vantage if they show up. As for fertilizer, I have had no problems with potassium nitrate(13-0-45) and soluble micronutrients applied once per month. I follow a more intensive program than the four rounds per year. The centipede is very green and hardy when fed this way. Also there is nothing wrong with using urea on centipede or any grass for that matter. Just understand that you cannot apply the whole season's requirement in one shot and whatever you apply is good for only 30-45 days. The only time I have seen problems is when someone broadcasted urea dry. It is hard to cover a lawn evenly with 2 lbs of granules. The lawn looked like a green dalmation. Not very professional results, in my opinion.
     
  6. RAlmaroad

    RAlmaroad LawnSite Silver Member
    from SC
    Posts: 2,174

    I checked the label It was clorine. 5.25%. I did not know that it would do that. I just spoke with the sod farmer. He said no Urea was put down before cutting. He also said that the late frost could be the problem. We did have frost about 3-4 weeks ago. I'll have to check into the potassium nitrate. I was trying to use a granular with the least of anything other that the dimension. However none of the other grass that was older has the yellowing. As a matter of fact it is beautiful. This was new sod next to older sod, which is why the strong difference. This sod was put down beside the county road after they filled the ditches. The fill could have something to do with it also. Anyway thanks for the info.
     
  7. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 8,941

    Because I am surrounded by the Pacific Ocean, I do not apply anything containing chlorides to turf unless it is that Seashore Paspalum. The salt levels in the soils here are borderline toxic as is. I do not use granular anything, because the K is from potassium chloride in most cases. If the fill soil is junk, there's your sign. At that point, I would be pulling a soil test to know exactly. Centipede needs a soil that is acidic, low in salts an high in K, S and micronutrients. It is not about who is going to pay for the soil test. I think in terms of losing the account if I do not deliver results above and beyond what "landscapers" can do.
     
  8. RAlmaroad

    RAlmaroad LawnSite Silver Member
    from SC
    Posts: 2,174

    Soil test around here are almost free ($6) I began to suspect the fill--who knows where it originated. I can take care of the yellowing without too much problems. It was just strange that the rest of the lawns (almost 2 acres) was just coming out of dormancy; looking greenish and then the road frontage was begining to yellow. We've had some rain but not torents but it will be fine when the weather warms and the sun pops out for more than an hour. Thanks again.
     
  9. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 8,941

    If it is in the fill soil areas, then get that soil test. With centipede, I do not like to guess, because it is very unforgiving of mistakes. Here, I can get a soil test for $16 from the University of Hawaii. That test is not worth the paper it is printed on. I rather send it out of state to A&L. That way I have an idea of micronutrient levels too and a reference range is provided. Yes it is $35, but I can then formulate a solution that hits all of the points. I do not want fertilizer recomendations because the agronomist is under the assumption that it is practical to till in granules. I invite someone to "till in granules" on a $50,000 install that has already been in for over a year.
     
  10. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 8,941

    One more thing, if that Lesco 0-0-7 is 5.25% chlorine, then it is less than 100% KCl. The filler to make that low analysis could even be limestone. That is yet another reason why I fomulate for an individual lawn with technical materials. I am putting down a measured amount of potassium nitrate + whatever else I want in there and no mystery components. At the rates that I use, 50 lb of potassium nitrate + 6 lb of Feature will cover 2 acres and give you really nice turf. Then add either 4 lb simazine or the label rate of Dimension EW or WSP and you are all set. Having to lift and handle 50 lb bags is a drag for me. Most of my lawns are up to 5000 sq ft, so fertilizer for those is no more than 8lb of dry material even if it a heavy feeder like bermuda.
     

Share This Page