Straw blowing

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by Loganwildman, Jul 30, 2004.

  1. Loganwildman

    Loganwildman LawnSite Member
    Posts: 60

    We have an opportunity to bid on a large (15 acres) seed job for a big construction company around here and the specs call for straw to be blown over the seed. My question is what is a good rule of thumb for coverage? I'm thinking 60-70 bales an acre. Is this way off?
     
  2. Turboguy

    Turboguy LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,967

    You are close Logan, We figure a bale will cover 500 square feet. You might want to figure 85 bales to the acre +/-
     
  3. Loganwildman

    Loganwildman LawnSite Member
    Posts: 60

    Is it normal for a City spec to include straw coverage for large flat areas? The job I am looking at caluclates to 51 acres, and is 99% flat ground that was once a field. City spec I was given indicates straw in all areas except steep banks and cuts (what defines steep)
    My calculations puts it at 4500 bales which seems unreal to me. (I'm used to using maybe 100 bale)
     
  4. Turboguy

    Turboguy LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,967

    Well if it makes you feel better I calcualted it at 4335 bales. After you lift those, the next 165 would have seemed much heavier anyway. I am sure you might be used to using 100 bales which would cover a good sized residential lot, but 51 acres is a lot of ground.

    Yes, I would say if they are going to use straw they would want coverage everywhere to keep the soil moist and promote germination.

    As far as what comprises "steep" You know what they say. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Steep is the same way and might be thought of differntly in Iowa than Colorado. What are they asking for on the steep banks, Erosion control blankets or ?

    I know some people with a good, almost new straw blower for sale. They do mostly jobs like you are looking at and decided to go with a bigger one. It is in the free classifieds at www.i-hydroseeding.com if you want to check it out. I think there might have been two there.
     
  5. Loganwildman

    Loganwildman LawnSite Member
    Posts: 60

    The print I was given states:
    Steep banks and cuts, low maintenance areas (not mowed) and channels and areas of conventrated flow require alternate seeding and mulch anchoring methods. Refer to Indiana handbook for erosion control in developing areas.

    I want to pass on this as I'm afraid it is too much for a part time crew to deal with, but my partner wants to go for it, because it could open some doors and could let us go full time.
     
  6. Loganwildman

    Loganwildman LawnSite Member
    Posts: 60

    I already have a straw blower. Although I'd love to pickup the type that you can drop in a whole bale (strings and all)
     
  7. Turboguy

    Turboguy LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,967

    If you get that job you will get your moneys worth from the straw blower. Sounds like you have a TGMI. That is a good one. There are pros and cons both ways. It is nice not to have to cut strings and flake bales, but some of the lower cost ones that take full bales have a little higher maintance.
     
  8. Loganwildman

    Loganwildman LawnSite Member
    Posts: 60

    Your right, I have the TGMI. It's the one that has a hose that requires an operator and another to feed the flakes. I'd like to sell that one and get the one with the cannon. That way the same person can operate the cannon, and feed the straw. Saving manhours.
     
  9. Turboguy

    Turboguy LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,967

    Yea, the Cannons are a nice time saver and you can still add the hose if you have an application where you need it.

    The used one I mentioned for sale is the same unit but with the cannon.
     
  10. ToroMaster

    ToroMaster LawnSite Member
    from Neenah
    Posts: 53

    You only need 1500 bales of straw for 15 acres. 4500 bales is for 51 acres!
     

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