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Stump The Technician,,,Name That Tool

Discussion in 'Mechanic and Repair' started by piston slapper, Oct 26, 2012.

  1. Patriot Services

    Patriot Services LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 12,441

    Never had a special tool for splits rims. Damn things were ballistic missiles waiting to happen if they weren't seated correctly.
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  2. piston slapper

    piston slapper LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,240

    You got that right...a bunch of people bought the farm workin on those rims..
    I used to tack weld them...and set forklift forks on top of them ..before airing them up with a 20 foot standoff air valve..
    They were scary...they would cut anything in half if they came loose under pressure..
     
  3. fatboynormmie

    fatboynormmie LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,012

    Hey fellas:waving:


    The prybar I picked up at an estate sale years ago and always used it like a lady slipper for blind bearing removal and general bearing removal where space was limited


    Sooooo you guys may be right it actually my be for split rims but I never used it for that.

    Here's a couple pics of Lady Slippers and specialty prybars that I use alot.Once you figure out how many uses they have and how they can help you they will simply amaze you.

    The littlest ones get used daily .Ever try to align covers or shields and get your butt kicked.Well get one side kinda lined up shove the lady slipper in till she bottoms out and the taper of the shank lines the holes up and acts as a third hand.At that point jump to another hole and line the panels up and start your bolts.


    The Red thingy is a railroad jack(gear driven)and if you can put a long enough leverage bar in the sucker you could probably pick up a mountain.
    I have picked up 10 tons with this jack on a regular basis.

    2013-03-28_18-19-36_122.jpg

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  4. Patriot Services

    Patriot Services LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 12,441

    Prybars are another tool no good mechanic can do without a drawer full of. They get little respect though. Most times a little leveraged pressure and a few hammer taps are all that's needed to remove delicate cast parts. My dad has a bunch he MADE out of leaf springs leaves. A trick he picked up in Korea. I know all you pros know this stuff but I like to post up to help the lurking newbies. All Normie is missing is the 5ft long chisel tip BFPB.
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  5. Breezmeister

    Breezmeister LawnSite Bronze Member
    Male, from South Jersey
    Posts: 1,458

    This is so true. I watch a guy trying to move the forks on a skid steer, kicking and pushing the one side, I had made 2 out of 3/4 square stock that are 4 foot long. I handed him one and I showed him how to work smart and not break his foot. A little bit of leverage can made your day .
     
  6. fatboynormmie

    fatboynormmie LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,012

    Here's a couple more prybars that stay in my service truck that get used on a reg.basis

    Listing a few more important tools that I consider must haves.....


    There is the Fluke collection of mine.The large unit is a scope meter

    Next is the angle hyd. wrenches really helpful in tight quarters.

    Then there's the Snap-on cordless impacts .These are used daily.The only shop I get to work in is my own .All other repairs are out on the road and sometimes there's not an air hose long enough.

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  7. fatboynormmie

    fatboynormmie LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,012

    For you guys that are into electrical troubleshooting The Loadpro meter leads are an awesome addition to any meter.

    They allow you to put a load on the circuit you are working on and show you voltage drop (high resistance).They also don't have sharp points on the tips .The tips are actually concave and fit on connector pins extremely well.Look it up on Youtube.They are worth owning.

    2013-03-29_14-40-25_962.jpg
     
  8. piston slapper

    piston slapper LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,240

    Name That Tool...

    No its not an engine..It just looks like one...

    IMG_0377.JPG
     
  9. Patriot Services

    Patriot Services LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 12,441

    Two stage air compressor?
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  10. piston slapper

    piston slapper LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,240

    Ok...it is part of an engine..Kohler CH25...but it has a special purpose...
     

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