Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by bucktail, Aug 18, 2000.

  1. bucktail

    bucktail Member
    Posts: 67

    considering everyone in the world has access to this forum and are reading all types of posts about those willing to accept $10 for a mow which I believe really does hurt the industry and yes myself, I dont want my customers to start thinking wow I could just get some startup outfit or some kid to do the work for $10 and save myself $30 a week. When I must confront this I try to explain to the customers the incredible overhead involved on my end (most understand)however many just want the lowest cost available. So what say a commercial forum where to read,reply or post you must enter your federal tax ID #. The hope being to keep those who must make a living at this game to really be the ones involved with the forum. Keeping another forum open to homeowners, kids,and those not really involved in the industry from bringing down the proffesional attitude and PRICING which many of us depend on. Just an idea
  2. Scraper

    Scraper LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,656

    Not everyone has a Fed Id# .... sole proprietors with no employees don't need one and we're as professional as the rest. And I'm not putting my SS# either.

    Oh pricing is definitely above the norm in my area. :)

    P.S. Bucktail also helps when people fill out their profiles a little better. That way we can tell where you're from which helps decide whether our market can bear the prices another lists.
  3. bucktail

    bucktail Member
    Posts: 67

    Scraper dont get bent on me just an idea maybye business liscense or some other form of verification. No big deal but I will say this I dont care how you try to rationalize it or where you are from you can not make money charging $10 a lawn if you are running trailers,trucks,and equipment.Listen I CAN GO BROKE SITTING AT HOME
  4. bob

    bob LawnSite Platinum Member
    from DE
    Posts: 4,254

    What about the Canadian's that use this forum. And Southside (Karl), he's in Austraila. He probably doesn't have a Federal Tax ID #?
  5. Eric ELM

    Eric ELM Husband, Father, Friend, Angel
    Posts: 4,831

    You can look at this another way too. What if a home owner comes here and finds out he could get his 1.5 lawn mowed for $55 to $60 and it's taking him 4 hours to do it? He may say, gee, I think I'll just hire it done. A crew of 2 can knock that out in 20 minutes or 30 minutes and be out of there. This could go both ways, but it's just my opinion.
  6. Administrator

    Administrator Administrator
    Posts: 865

    If somebody will write up a article directed towards the home owner I will have a direct link to it...

    Explain to them why they should pick one company over the other... why company A is charging $10 and company B is charging $35. Let them know the risks involved in company A etc..

    What do you think? If someone wants to do this make sure its well written and in detail...

    I will have the link at the top or in the new section I am working on with the lawn company directory. That way after reading the article they can find a company in their area.. maybe yours.

    I think members of are a smarter company. This place helps bring awareness to the industry and hopefully every company that gets listed in the directory will be a legit company that cant afford to mow a lawn for $10.
  7. BRL

    BRL LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,211

    I believe the PLCAA, or one of the others, has a brochure geared toward consumers to help them choose contractors. I'm sure that some of the info. that they cover would be appropriate for what you are suggesting.
  8. thelawnguy

    thelawnguy LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,412

    Dear Customer

    Why You Should Hire A Professional Landscaper

    Dear Customer,

    I'll bet you didn't know that when you hire a non-professional to
    care for your grounds, you put yourself at risk. That may be news
    to you, but many who claim to be "landscapers" (so called
    experts) operate illegally, are uninsured, are breaking pesticide
    laws, don't pay taxes like you and me and here's the real "biggy"
    ... (that puts you at risk for losing everything you ever worked for)
    they don't have insurance! None, zip! No worker's comp ... no
    liability. Why is that important? Well I'm not a lawyer, but if
    someone from that company (even the owner himself) gets hurt on
    your property ... you can be sued for damages. It happens. Nice
    guy right? You give him the job ... he gives you a potential
    nightmare! Legal fees alone could "eat you alive".

    The first "tip-off" that should alert you is unusually low price. Fast
    talkers who are selling a bargain. Yeah, real bargain. Sloppy
    workmanship, the risk of them contaminating your yard with toxic
    chemicals, hacking down your prized plants, spilling gasoline on
    your blacktop drive ... and other blunders that will make you wish
    you never ran into those characters.

    Incompetent landscapers who don't know what they're doing,
    have no references you can trust ... and so ... must compete on
    low price. But it's no bargain, because in the end, you usually get
    what you pay for.

    So ... how do you "qualify" your landscaper?

    1. Ask for a certificate of insurance directly from the agency.
    Some landscapers actually forge documents that they are covered
    when they are not!

    2. Ask for references.

    3. Check prices by comparing apples to apples. Get prices from
    professionals who are insured. You'd be surprised how many
    workers have lost fingers and toes while mowing grass ... and who
    pays the medical bills and damage suit? you guessed it!

    4. Ask the contractor about his employees. Are they legal? Would
    you want an "unidentified" person roaming around your place? Or
    do you want folks who will respect your privacy?

    5. Ask your contractor how long he's been in business. Almost
    70% of new businesses fail in landscaping in the first three years.
    Was it because they did poor work? Was it because they were
    sued? Was it because they made a shambles of the yards they
    worked on? Who knows? ... but you should get to know the
    contractor before you hire them.

    That's it. A few simple precautions before you sign on the dotted
    line can save you from making a big mistake. You need a good
    job done at a fair price. Talk to a professional.

    Thank you,

    Joe Smith
    ABC Landscaping
    Anytown, USA
  9. Guido

    Guido LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,085

    Bill, Well done man! I printed that one out to put in my "archive".

    Now, only if they'd listen!

  10. Eric ELM

    Eric ELM Husband, Father, Friend, Angel
    Posts: 4,831

    I also saved that one. :)

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