"Summer Patch"

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by Got Grass?, Apr 23, 2003.

  1. Got Grass?

    Got Grass? LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 363

    What exactly is summer patch? What is the cause & how is it treated?
    I was giving a mowing/landscaping estimate today for a customer who just moved in. Apparently the lawn had bad case of it last year & the previous owner just let it go. Instead letting their applicator treat it. It is in a upscale neighborhood, so the dead spots look really bad in the lawn.
    I can't apply anything to it thats what the other guys are for but what recommendations do you guys have? I'm curious to learn more about it.

  2. GroundKprs

    GroundKprs LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,969

    Any disease is just a case of the right host, the pathogen, and the right environmental conditions. If the host, your turf in this circumstance, is weakened by poor cultural practices, it will be much more susceptable to any disease or other problems.

    It is my experience that patch disease will take about 5 years to work itself out: 1st year is noticeable, 2nd is bad, 3rd is horrible, 4th is like 2nd, and 5th is like 1st. While chemicals can arrest the development, they will be very expensive. You must be applying optimum cultural practices for turf to recover.

    And before you start on management, you need a correct diagnosis: do you have summer patch or Necrotic ring spot? Get a sample to a good diagnostic lab. Read about both diseases at bottom of this index: http://www.btny.purdue.edu/Pubs/#turf
  3. Got Grass?

    Got Grass? LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 363

    The app guy said it was Summer Patch so thats what we are going with. It's up to them to properly diagnose & apply whatever chem's necessary. Hopefully I can get in there & help out w/ the mowing side of it. Unfortunately it looks as if this is gunna be a rough ride for the next few yrs.

    Thanks for the info... That is a GREAT link I'll be checking out more often.
  4. lordohturf

    lordohturf LawnSite Member
    from SW OH
    Posts: 173

    Summer patch disease is notorious during periods of high humidity and high temps on turf ( bluegrass especially)
    that has been fertilized heavily.

    for best cultural practices

    do: leave grass high, water in morning, bag and dispose of grass
    if severe enough case, keep a sharp mower blade,

    don't: cut grass during heat of day, cut in same pattern each time, fertilize until symptoms or conditions change, irrigate late night, worry about it too much.

    Preventive fungicide treatments can be done when conditions are right at about 1/2 curative rates. Do at least once monthly during
    periods of high heat and humidity ( combinate of the two equal
    150 or higher).

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