Tea Brewer Pics?

Discussion in 'Organic Lawn Care' started by DUSTYCEDAR, Feb 1, 2008.

  1. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,308

    Agreed and I apologize if I misunderstood what you said. I thought the point you were trying to make was that by providing suitable conditions, the biology would follow naturally.

    All compost is not created equal, I think we all can agree on that. If your local sources of compost are somewhat questionable with respect to the biology, then perhaps finishing the composting process yourself may be a viable answer.

    My intent with suggesting local sources of compost is that it is more sustainable approach than manufacturing a product and shipping it to the site.
     
  2. tadhussey

    tadhussey LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 294

    Smallaxe,

    What I'm talking about is where you have a brewer on-site and are brewing the tea yourself. When I talk about a kit, what I mean is the compost and nutrients that go into the brewer.

    What we do with our Pro Kits is we take a burlap bag that previously held organic coffee and put our fungal compost on one side, and our compost blend (alaska humus and vermicompost) on the other. We do this because the composts are different densities and the fungal compost has higher O2 requirements. We then send you a ziploc bag that contains a premeasured amount of foods (for the biology in the compost). In our case, all you would do is empty the compost into the bags and then sprinkle the foods into the water and brew.
     
  3. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,308

    Tom, you got me thinking about this. What are peoples thoughts (in particular Bill and Tim) on using a product like the one Bill supplies to inoculate a questionable compost?

    What I am thinking here is CT may not be right for everyone, for whatever reason. In order to promote the use of sustainable practices and organic programs, I feel we need to find some viable and sustainable alternatives to CT.
     
  4. Tom Jaszewski

    Tom Jaszewski LawnSite Member
    Posts: 52

    What does Bill supply?
     
  5. phasthound

    phasthound LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,575

    Go to ictorganics.com
     
  6. tadhussey

    tadhussey LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 294

    Kiril,

    What do you mean by not right for everyone? Do you mean it wouldn't be beneficial for everyone, or that some people would not want to take the time and energy to properly make and apply compost teas?

    I think there a few instances where compost tea is not necessary, but most soils are lacking in beneficial biology, so I don't think that compost tea would ever be detrimental to a program. The issue is cost (labor) vs benefits. In most cases I would say the benefit outweighs the cost. I'll admit that there could be exceptions to that though.
     
  7. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,308

    The latter, but I would include up front cost in that list if buying a large commercial brewer.
     
  8. tadhussey

    tadhussey LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 294

    Sure, if you performed a soil biology test and you had good soil biology already, you could just focus on feeding that biology with micronutrients (humic acid, soluble kelp, fish, etc...).

    In my experience though, most people don't have wonderful soil, either due to over use of chemicals, improper care, etc..
     
  9. Tom Jaszewski

    Tom Jaszewski LawnSite Member
    Posts: 52

    A number of us found that the cost savings from developing a healthy soil food web were significant enough to quickly pay for the equipment costs. Kiril would you mind talking about your experience with compost tea. Being a new guy I'm in the dark.
     
  10. tadhussey

    tadhussey LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 294

    Tom,

    Just wanted to say "hi." Good to see you on here. Hope everything has been going well with you since the last time we talked!

    ~Tad
     

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