Teenagers in the business...

Discussion in 'General Industry Discussions' started by lawnranger44, Jun 5, 2003.

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  1. Green in Idaho

    Green in Idaho LawnSite Senior Member
    from Idaho
    Posts: 833

    That would be the ultimate!

    Someone who is 16, works for the fire dept after school and on their days off from responding to fire alarms they mow lawns!

    AND they have 3 w/b, 3 riders, and 10 trimmers for their 50 accounts. :dizzy:

    Seriously I do applaud the honest youngsters on here who are kicking some grass in staring their own businesses or even just some spending money. Keep on rollin!
     
  2. Heron Cove PM

    Heron Cove PM LawnSite Member
    Posts: 216

    I'm not one to knock a guy down (unless he owns a Chevrolet;) JK) but I think any person should chase any dream that they have, make the best of it and I hope they succeed.

    I guess my question is, in an industry that is as large as ours, with as many diverse people out there trying to make it, where are you young guys getting your true commercial experience? Don't get me wrong, I mean the up most respect to all of you, but I have been in this industry for God knows how long, held every position from laborer to owner, from residential to commercial and cut everything from a town house to high end, multi-million dollar properties; like the headquarters of Marriott. There is a HECK OF A LOT of stuff that I am still learning; but the one thing that is constant now matter where you fit in the scheme of things, there is a true difference between a professional commercial outfit and a high school kid with a lawn mower. Don't get me wrong, I'm sure you guys do great work, but how can you be up to par with the big dogs if you have never worked or learned from one? Just a thought. Best of Luck!

    Marshall:confused:
     
  3. Allgreen

    Allgreen LawnSite Member
    from PA
    Posts: 9

    Heron Cove PM,
    I got all of my experience from my dad, my dad's side of the family has been in this industry for generations. My dad used to own a rather large LCO in North Carolina, and i used to go out with him and stuff since i was 10. I started to actually cut peoples grass when i lived down their when i was around 12, and being able to use his equipment it was rather easy. Since then I have been working with a smaller LCO but it is still work. I know I have no where as much knowledge about this industry as most of you do, but we all start somewhere.
     
  4. BSDeality

    BSDeality LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,850

    i grew up around bulldozers, trucks, jeeps, boats, mowers, tractors, you name it, if it had a motor, i'd drive it. As for how I "learned" without ever actually operating with an LCO... I just watched them as they cut houses around me, I made mental notes how they negotiated obstacles and left the best stripes. After i bought my commercial deck the first 5 cuts were all learning days, after then i had it down pretty good. I still learn new tips and tricks everyday by watching LCO's around me. My next big step is doing more landscaping projects and i've learned quite a bit just from searching the countless informative posts here as well as landscape mag's and looking at established companies work.

    I don't know whats so hard to understand about doing landscaping, mowing and trimming, the hard part is estimating time/cost's on the fly, until i can get a better grasp on that myself i have to continue to charge by the hour for most jobs (mowing excluded), after i get a feel for it, I hope to be able to just flat-fee it for jobs.
     
  5. stxkyboy

    stxkyboy LawnSite Member
    Posts: 222

    I'm one of those teenagers that cuts multi-million lots. I tell u the difference between a teenage and the "professionals" The "professionals" are either nonenglish speaking mexicans or some guy who couldnt give a damn about how the yard looks as long as he gets to the next job on time. The teenager (thats moi) takes time to ensure that every cut is perfect. The teenager then gets all the "professionals" jobs. How did i learn.....trial and error....its grass cutting not brain surgery. Some people im sure are exagerating but i think its a lot fewer people than u think
     
  6. Allgreen

    Allgreen LawnSite Member
    from PA
    Posts: 9

    "The "professionals" are either nonenglish speaking mexicans or some guy who couldnt give a damn about how the yard looks as long as he gets to the next job on time. "

    Lol....thats a good one stxkyboy:D
     
  7. stxkyboy

    stxkyboy LawnSite Member
    Posts: 222

    Im completely serious....thats the truth
     
  8. Allgreen

    Allgreen LawnSite Member
    from PA
    Posts: 9

    And thats the sad thing....in most cases it is
     
  9. Heron Cove PM

    Heron Cove PM LawnSite Member
    Posts: 216

    Easy bro, cool your jets; I wasn't't trying to attack you. Yes, you are absolutely right. There are a lot, however not all professional companies that fit your mold. I would like to think I am an exception to that rule. I don't leave a yard until I AM 210% satisfied with it! I'd bet ya a couple of beers, I would be the most anal retentive person you'll ever meet; and I very much pride myself on professionalism. Oh, sorry I'm not bilingual.

    Yes, once again you are correct. The physical labor part is not brain surgery. After reading my original post, I apologize for my error. I am not just talking about experience cutting grass. I am also talking about experience running a company. Whether its income is $200.00 or $200 million dollars, a business is a business and there is a lot more to running one than just having a degree will afford. I am talking about EVERY aspect of this industry, i.e. scheduling, time constraints, managerial skills, profit & loss margins, on the spot financial decisions, productivity of a crew; be it one man or ten! How about being mature enough to handle a situation (God Forbid) your mower throws a golf ball and beans a 4-year old upside the head 4 yards away? Again, I'm not attacking you individually, but just in general, do you think a 14, 15, 16 year old with a push mower and 2 years experience can make a lot of these decisions on a day to day basis?

    Again, I wish you the best of luck!

    Marshall
     
  10. Jimmy348

    Jimmy348 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 133

    Jeez, I wasn't directing it at anyone. Just having a little fun on a rainy day. Good luck and I wish all of you only the best :D
     
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