Thinking of Relocating My Business to Another state

Discussion in 'Business Operations' started by Georgiehopper, Jun 21, 2004.

  1. Georgiehopper

    Georgiehopper LawnSite Member
    Posts: 187

    and I have been doing some demographic studies of different promising areas.

    But I'm wondering if anyone has some good ideas on the best ways to find out the following:

    * what areas have a good demand for landscaping
    * How to find the going rates for work in various states/cities
    * What criteria should I be considering before I make my move

    Thanks in advance for any help!
     
  2. Team Gopher

    Team Gopher LawnSite Platinum Member
    from -
    Posts: 4,041

    Hi Georgiehopper,

    How about contacting that state's trade association. I am sure they would have lots of information to share with you.
     
  3. Mdirrigation

    Mdirrigation LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,766

    You are in Northern Virginia , and you are looking for greener pastures ?
     
  4. Avery

    Avery LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,389

    Kinda what I was thinking Mdirrigation.

    You are in a good area already Georgiehopper. Gonna be hard to find an area any better.
     
  5. Georgiehopper

    Georgiehopper LawnSite Member
    Posts: 187

    Not greener pastures....more peaceful and cooler ones. This area is great for making money no doubt about it, buts its high stress, high traffic, and extremely high cost of living. Its also high humidity and high heat.
     
  6. grassyfras

    grassyfras LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,472

    All I can say is that I took a trip out to Sun Valley Idaho last year. Yes Idaho. Its the greatest place. I went mid summer. It was 90 degress out with zero humidity. I rode a bike for 20 miles down there and I never ridin a bike since I was about 10. Beutiful weather and then It snows for probbly 4 or 5 months out of the year. Huge tourist town and growing fast. Celebritys are all over the place. Oprah, Bill Gates, Some figure skates. Tons of Rental Properties and from what I saw their were 3 big landscaping companies out there who seemed to have plenty of business. Irrigation would be a must out there and their would be little mowing. I dont know if thats what your looking for but I;v always thought about moving to another stae and i would have to move out West if I did. Another place would be on the outskirts of Salt Lake City I forgot the city but its growing rapidly and its a beutiful place.
     
  7. Mdirrigation

    Mdirrigation LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,766

    Not greener pastures....more peaceful and cooler ones. This area is great for making money no doubt about it, buts its high stress, high traffic, and extremely high cost of living. Its also high humidity and high heat.

    I can agree with that, but the high cost of living is offset by the amount of work and the higher prices we get in this area. A good friend of mine moved up to Pennsylvania, near Seven Springs , he loved the slower pace, the cooler summers , no traffic . But he is barely making a living , he is coming back down here during the week to make money and going home on the weekend . If you are going to move look at the overall economy in the area
     
  8. Georgiehopper

    Georgiehopper LawnSite Member
    Posts: 187

    4 years ago my business was in Pittsburgh and I moved here because of the promising future plus I got married.

    It was difficult to make a living landscaping in PIttsburgh but the cost of living there is deceiving. Many people think its very cheap, but there is high sales tax and quarterly wage tax which most other states don't have to deal with.

    I am considering three areas: Asheville North Caroline, Eastern Pa, and Laconia, New Hampshire.

    I don't need to be a millionaire...just comfortable.
     

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