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Thinking of starting up again

Discussion in 'Starting a Lawn Care Business' started by Swampy, Jan 19, 2013.

  1. NOVAMowing

    NOVAMowing LawnSite Member
    Posts: 42

    It must be nice to be so successful that you have free time to troll a hard working, humble, eager individual. Please omnipotent one, please PLEASE share more of your words of wisdom. Schlep.

    At OP, only you can answer this. However, If you are looking for some encouraging words, I say 'If you know, you know' and if it is all you can think about day and night... you know. Having been on both sides, I will say that gainful self-employment is the most challenging, rewarding and frustrating thing you will ever do. Watch your money. Covet it. Do not buy anything until you have to. Year one (again) means no vacations and no new toys. Your credit is your lifeline; only use it as an absolute last option. Oh, and one other sentiment, disregard comments from those who try to hold you down. I do not know one single successful person in any industry who spends their time belittling people just starting out.

    Cheers and keep us posted.
  2. Swampy

    Swampy LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,435

    Thanks for the votes of confidence.

    @Sean yes planning and planning, even worse case everything. One thing being a marine has taught me is that even the best laid plans can fail, adapt and overcome.

    @NOVA a business is measured in success but the failures it has. Even though my first go at it was a complete failure, you get back up and get beat down again just to pick yourself up again to repeat that cycle. I was watching the TV show on the History Channel "The men who built America" and honestly I wishing they would get into more of their failures than successes. I'll keep you all posted on what goes on.

    Thinking of taking a look into the local chamber of commerece, maybe joining to get some more local marketing ideas and the networking wouldn't hurt.
  3. Rick Grantham

    Rick Grantham LawnSite Member
    Posts: 23

    Swampy- I completely agree with the approach of joining the local chamber of commerce. Socialize where your customers socialize. Get to know them, have a beer/coffee with them at the Chamber of Commerce or wherever they are. You want them to get to know your face/name. That's a relatively inexpensive exercise.

  4. UniqueLawn&LandscapeTN

    UniqueLawn&LandscapeTN LawnSite Member
    Posts: 35

    I'm in the same situation as you are Swampy, I failed last year...well I made money, I just failed at my personal goals and didnt see the growth and prosperity I was expecting.
  5. Swampy

    Swampy LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,435

    The thing I learned is that you won't get rich in this business, but "wealth" can be measured in other forms than money. I got into a funk last year, after I found out in actuality the amount I was making a month to how much I was working, I nearly punked and everytime I went out to cut grass it was the same feeling, every minute I'd be servicing equipment. I did feel that "funk" towards the end of the first year but it was at the time pack everything away for the winter.

    Thanks rick I'll take that to heart. Face time is always great.
  6. Durabird02

    Durabird02 LawnSite Member
    from Indiana
    Posts: 144

    There are a lot of very wealthy LCO's on this thread alone. But to go out the first year and expect to be rolling in the dough and living lavishly is part of the reason you got in the funk. These types of businesses are built by busting your a$$ and putting your heart and sole into it. Eventually, years down the road and if it is run correctly, it pays off. The time frame is different for everyone, it's all a matter of making a plan and following it. Also, find out what your overhead is and your cost to operate. That will help you to bid jobs more accurately and they will actually be profitable.

    Good luck to you, heres to hoping for a better 2013:drinkup:
  7. UniqueLawn&LandscapeTN

    UniqueLawn&LandscapeTN LawnSite Member
    Posts: 35

    I'm going into this year with a different mindset, the last few years I just pay my helper and put the rest in my pocket and when I need something I just buy it out of my pocket....this year I "plan" to pay myself a SET amount weekly and any other I make I'm going to put into my business account to live on through winter and for business expenses. I'm really going to try and run it more like a BUSINESS instead of my side job...being as it is my FULL-TIME JOB!!
  8. eggy

    eggy LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 945

    I owned a lawn care buisness for some time and got out. Belive it or not there are a lot of landscaping jobs working for someone else that will offer freedom similar to that of owning your own buisness could be working for a mom and pop or large company. Recently a company contacted me about a district landscape supervisor postion they wanted to begin and asked if i was interested. The answer isnt always self employment stay in the industry long enough build a good repution. Good jobs will come after you.......just a thought.
  9. jsslawncare

    jsslawncare LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,674

    To put more money in your pocket do you really need a helper? I'm solo with about 65-85 yards to maintain and the only reason I have a helper is because he's my son.
  10. Swampy

    Swampy LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,435

    Giving yourself a "SET" amount, such as $350/week, would seem to much like a salary position no matter if you work 40hrs one week or 60hrs the next. Eventually your going to wear yourself thin I would believe. The pay per week should be a incentive type mindset, the more hours you work at it in a week the more pay you recieve (like a regauler job). Stay late make more kind of thinking

    But thats my thinking on that.

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