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Tif 419 Bermuda in Texas

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by jason72g, Jul 24, 2012.

  1. cgaengineer

    cgaengineer LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 15,782

    It's Bermuda...roundup doesn't even damage it!
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  2. Skipster

    Skipster LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,074

    Come around? I said the same thing I've always said -- the average bermudagrass lawn is best managed at 2".

    You can take it as low as you're comfortable, but you're going to use more inputs to do it and it's going to cost more money.
     
  3. Duekster

    Duekster LawnSite Fanatic
    from DFW, TX
    Posts: 7,961

    I think the relationship of more inputs has more to do with the desired quality of grass.

    What seemed to be missing was your rant about shortening the root system.
     
  4. cgaengineer

    cgaengineer LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 15,782

    I agree with this. When kept short (below 2") Bermuda is very dense and does a great job staying free of weeds. So I would say that inputs would be less to a point.

    I'm also believe there is a breaking point of cut height vs water usage as the more leaf and tissue the more surface area to lose hydration. I might be wrong and maybe you can shed some light on this Deukster.
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    Last edited: Jul 31, 2012
  5. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 8,802

    Glad I am not the only one who has observed this. Sure, bermuda can be maintained at over 1". Mowing is fast and cheap. However, in my area, hard to control grassy weeds soon take over. Mowing low is lower input than a herbicide program costing over $100 per acre and needing 4-5 applications at 30 day intervals with no guarantee of total removal.
     
  6. cgaengineer

    cgaengineer LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 15,782

    It's also much easier to spot weeds in shorter turf. Making spot spraying much easier.

    What's your take on Bermuda height vs irrigation requirements greendoctor? Would you say that taller Bermuda dries out faster than properly mowed at the correct height Bermuda?
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  7. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 8,802

    Tall bermuda not only loses more water faster due to more leaf area, the thatch caused by high mowing makes it that much harder to get water into the lawn.
     
  8. Skipster

    Skipster LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,074

    I'm not going to dig up old bones here and take this thread in a wrong direction. University research confirms that shorter cut turf has shorter roots, requires more water, and requires more of other inputs. We've been through this before. I posted facts, others posted "I'm right, trust me."

    In the end, you can maintain your lawns however you want. But, after years of research, years of extension phone calls from homeowners, and years of managing my own business, I have seen more problems with the short cut bermudagrass lawns than with the taller ones. That's all I'm saying.
     
  9. kennc38

    kennc38 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 293

    Not sure which university you're referring to, but NC State recommends a mowing height of 3/4 - 1": "Mow the lawn when it first turns green in the spring with a reel mower set at ¾ to 1 inch or a rotary mower set as low as possible without scalping. Mow before the grass gets taller than 1½ to 2 inches."

    However, they also go on to state that common bermuda can be maintained at a higher mowing height: "Common bermudagrass (wiregrass), compared to hybrid bermudagrass (Tifway and Tifgreen), can be seeded and maintained at a higher mowing height."

    http://www.turffiles.ncsu.edu/Turfgrasses/Bermudagrass.aspx#MC000016

    I hope this information helps the readers of this thread.
     
  10. Busa Dave

    Busa Dave LawnSite Member
    from DFW
    Posts: 42

    Transpiration is always worse the more surface area that is exposed---made even wose by winds and low humidity.
     

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