1. Missed the live Ask the Expert event?
    Not to worry. Check out the archived thread of the Q&A with Ken Hutcheson, President of U.S. Lawns, and the LawnSite community on the Franchising Forum.

    Dismiss Notice

Tips on pricing yards.

Discussion in 'Starting a Lawn Care Business' started by CRQualityMowing, Jan 9, 2012.

  1. CRQualityMowing

    CRQualityMowing LawnSite Member
    from Ohio
    Posts: 73

    I am in my second year in the lawn care business. One of the hardest things that I had trouble with was the pricing of my yards. I know that overhead and different variable play a part, but does anyone have a simple way of doing it? I have heard people price by simply $1 per minute on a job and then by the acre. Just wanting some ideas from the experienced out there. Thanks!
     
  2. smallstripesnc

    smallstripesnc LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 704

    A few tips people on here have given me is to set a hourly wage say $60hr and the property would take 30 minutes then you would get $30. Its an easy way to do it.

    Now figuring how long it will take is a different story. Usually depends on the terrain, obstacles, fence or no fence (You will have to line trim the perimeter resulting in more time), Rock drive way or pavement (rock you don't really need to spend a ton of time edging since you don't need a CRISP edge or anything. Now thats the hardest part that I even have issues with.

    I hope I helped!

     
  3. mowing4rlife

    mowing4rlife LawnSite Member
    Posts: 240

    The best way to price your mowing jobs is based on how long you think it will take you to do the lawn X $1 per minute.

    For Example: If i think a job is going to take me 45 min to do the mowing job, then i am going to charge $45-$55.I may even charge more, but i won't do it for less. After you do a few mowing jobs, you'll get the hang of it.

    Try it and let me know how it goes for you.
     
  4. CRQualityMowing

    CRQualityMowing LawnSite Member
    from Ohio
    Posts: 73

    Thanks. Keep the input coming!
     
  5. RGM

    RGM LawnSite Senior Member
    Male, from Baltimore Md
    Posts: 975

    You can't all ways think the $60 an hour you will price yourself out of alot of jobs. Sure when your on a 60'' zero turn cutting an acre you can get that but if you base your prices on $60 an hour and try to cut that acre with a push mower hows that going to work. You have to figure what mower would be the best for that lawn and how long should it take some lawns you can only put a push mower thru the gates so price it with your hourly rate some you can use a 48'' walk behind so price your hourly rate. I charge basically $45 an hour for most but if its a big lawn and I'm out on my zero turn I think you can get $60.
     
  6. Dr.NewEarth

    Dr.NewEarth LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,405

    Who pays for an employees time between cuts, when you're driving around? Be sure your costs are covering your expenses that way too.
     
  7. GrassLife

    GrassLife LawnSite Member
    Posts: 6

    I'm in my second year too. I still have customers that that I underbid last year, but they were my first customers and I just keep spoiling them. I was bidding scarred, afraid I might not get the business, and I'm still guilty of that at times, but RGM is right, 45.00/hr seems to work out well unless you peek around back and see swing sets, bird baths, rock gardens, sand boxes, and a lot of dog poop. Then go 60.00.
     
  8. xclusive

    xclusive LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,052

    It also depends on if you have an employee working with you. Personally I would never price a lawn by $1/min. I compare lawns that I already service to the one I'm giving an estimate to and go from there. Once you kick yourself in the @$$ enough you will learn real quick.
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  9. CRQualityMowing

    CRQualityMowing LawnSite Member
    from Ohio
    Posts: 73

    This year I plan on having a part time employee due to a commercial contract I have picked up. This past year that's what I found myself doing was pricing my yards compared to others I was doing. I sometimes felt like I was doing them too cheap, but once you price and perform the job you're kinda stuck at that price.
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  10. Thanksman

    Thanksman LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,695

    I caught the poop statement, I actually saw a person in a truck lettered doggie doo, and they charged people just to pick up dog poop. :laugh::laugh: so im woundering if they can make a business out of it. Does anyone actually do this in their landscape co?:confused:
     

Share This Page