Tires or tracks

Discussion in 'Heavy Equipment & Pavement' started by Kgrebs, Feb 21, 2005.

  1. Kgrebs

    Kgrebs LawnSite Member
    Posts: 43

    I am sure that this post is already on the site somewhere but I have had no luck finding it. I am in the process of buying my first machine (skid steer) and have some questions for the experts and experienced members of the site. First of all, who has had the best luck with these brands, JD, Cat and ASV? Secondly, tires or tracks? I have used both but what is the best al around application?

    As always, thanks for the help.
     
  2. Scag48

    Scag48 LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,068

    Well I like to wave the Cat flag quite a bit, so I guess I will right now. Now Cat and ASV are basically the same thing, except for Cat is going to be a little more expensive because of the name, etc. We love our 216, can't beat the pilot controls and the numerous other features on the machine. Also, their product and dealer support is second to none. I've heard absolute horror stories about JD, but their new 300 series looks pretty impressive, haven't heard alot of reviews about them yet, but things seem to be going better for them this time around. Anyway, tracks or tires. This is a pretty easy evaluation, although you can't have it all, you need to analyze what kind of things you'll be doing, for instance:

    1) What kind of work are you doing?
    2) Will you be strictly on dirt or will you be on pavement sometimes?
    3) Are you consistently working in muddy, sandy, or loose conditions that permit a tracked machine?
    4) Are you financially ready to pay $10-$15,000 more for a tracked machine?

    These are just a few questions for you to toss around. Once you answer these questions, the solution becomes quite clear. In most cases, a wheeled machine with removeable steel tracks is almost as effective as a tracked machine and that might be one avenue you travel down. Feed us more info, that'll give us a better idea of what you plan to be doing with your piece.
     
  3. jd270

    jd270 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 102

    well as far as the deere i have a 270 and it has been great no isues at all and i use it hard its been by far a better machine than the bobcat 873 i had before as far as tracks go they suck in the snow my buddy has a t190 for sod but when it comes to moving snow he uses a deere 260 and all the guy i know even the ture bobcat users are now usind the deere low pro buckets they work great
     
  4. Tigerotor77W

    Tigerotor77W LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Germany
    Posts: 1,891

    Yup, second Scag's questions. Need more information before anyone can tell you what he or she feels is best.
     
  5. Kgrebs

    Kgrebs LawnSite Member
    Posts: 43

    We are doing basic landscape construction but not a lot of stone work. More lawns and renovation, bed developement and the like. Also, will be doing some post holes for concrete forms for a local contractor and some trenching for sprinklers and title 5 digs and other light excavation. My concern is that a fair amount of our work is in already manicured and neat/tidy areas. I know that the wide track is less likely to "eat" up the grass then some tired machines.
     
  6. StoneStacker

    StoneStacker LawnSite Member
    from OR
    Posts: 47

    "More lawns and renovation, bed developement and the like. Also, will be doing some post holes for concrete forms for a local contractor and some trenching for sprinklers and title 5 digs and other light excavation. My concern is that a fair amount of our work is in already manicured and neat/tidy areas."

    Based on your job description, I would recommend looking at ASVs Turf tracks. I'm not sure if CAT offers them, although they use the same undercarriage system.
     
  7. Tigerotor77W

    Tigerotor77W LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Germany
    Posts: 1,891

    I think StoneStacker's opinion is pretty much a good idea. The Turf Edition ASV machines are probably what you're looking for, but I would suggest talking to some companies that use them to see how the belts are holding up and try to determine whether they'll hold up well in your area. It would seem to me that some of your conditions might warrant a bit more traction than smooth tracks would give, but generally speaking, you'll be pretty well-off with a TE ASV.

    On the wheeled side, I would take a look at the A300 (Bobcat). While it won't prevent you from sinking into really soft ground, you can equip it with turf tires to help prevent some of that. Its articulated axles also allow you to turn on the grass without ripping it up. There's a thread on the A300 here already... take a look at that for a bit more information and a link to an article about the 863 vs. T200 vs. A220. While I feel that the A300 is more suited to your line of work, I'm definitely not the person to say for certain that it's the machine you should definitely buy.
     
  8. ksss

    ksss LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 7,126

    If your working on primarily established lawns I also agree the ASV would be the way to go. As far as the size of machine that would depend on your lifting and production requirements. The A300 would work fine except they are heavy and although they don't tear the grass like a skid steer when turning the shear weight will leave ruts in the ground depending on how much moisture was in the lawn. Loegren makes ASV type tracks that bolt on and off a wheeled skid steer. Seems like a great option if you like to have both capabilities. I have never run a machine with these tracks I am responding based on what I have read. However they are expensive.
     

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