Tires slipping on zero turn mower

Discussion in 'General Industry Discussions' started by Bayrat, Sep 11, 2005.

  1. Bayrat

    Bayrat LawnSite Member
    from NY
    Posts: 121

    I have a 2005 Gravely 260 that I use for my three acre lawn. I have had trouble with the turf tires slipping when trying to do turns that require fast movement from forward to reverse as well as on the 12-15 degree slope around my pool berm.

    They shocked me a few days ago when they would not hold the incline on dry grass at a relatively slow speed. I almost went into the lilac bush at the base of the berm.

    Is there a better tire available for use on these things? I have seen the Dixie Choppers in action and they are run at a much faster speed and sharper turn without problems.
     
  2. Runner

    Runner LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,494

    2 things...Ease up on the way you jam your sticks. Every mower can and will do this at some point in the right conditions. Second,...let a little air out of your tires. This will give you a significantly better ride and you will have much better traction. Just a little air out can make a huge difference.
     
  3. Mowingman

    Mowingman LawnSite Platinum Member
    from Texas
    Posts: 4,666

    Dixie Choppers will tear up grass worse than any other brand of ZTR I have ever operated. Wheel spin is 99.9% the fault of the operator. It takes time and experience to learn proper operation, and thus reduce wheel spin. Also, remember, never point the nose of any ZTR downhill. You will lose traction and slide.
     
  4. Bayrat

    Bayrat LawnSite Member
    from NY
    Posts: 121

    I will try the tire idea. Not running down hill is not too convenient, what should one do? Back and forth requires it to head down at some point.

    I take credit for the spinning tires, just trying to eliminate that aspect.

    Thanks
     
  5. waffletown20

    waffletown20 LawnSite Member
    from PA
    Posts: 100

    The most trouble for tire spinning is usually when you turn around. Always turn up the hill and then slowly reverse down turning slightly towards your next track and then continue. If you try and turn downhill you'll lose traction. I start turning uphill about 6 feet away and then swoop up the hill. Everything should be done slowly. This method has worked for me but I still skid every once in a while. I hope this helps.
     
  6. Bayrat

    Bayrat LawnSite Member
    from NY
    Posts: 121

    Thanks again for the tips. It seems so odd that these machines are light on traction.
     
  7. MarcSmith

    MarcSmith LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 7,157

    Just rememeber if you do let some air out of the tires it will alter your cut height a little bit....so that root you never ever hit, you may just hit....

    as opposed to going side to side, what about driving straight up the slope and backing back down....
     
  8. Bayrat

    Bayrat LawnSite Member
    from NY
    Posts: 121

    Marc

    Thanks, that is what I have been doing. I thought perhaps there was a way to avoid this but it seems not.
     
  9. waffletown20

    waffletown20 LawnSite Member
    from PA
    Posts: 100

    If you tear on the flat ground when turning, just make sure both wheels are always moving by looking at the inside wheel. Either that or the 3 point turn work.
     
  10. grassmanvt

    grassmanvt LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 906

    They have great traction but its a differant way of thinking and driving. You just have to get used to the differant characteristics and use the good ones to your advantage and avoid the bad ones. Just takes a little time.
     

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