Tires

Discussion in 'Hardscaping' started by tthomass, Oct 8, 2009.

  1. tthomass

    tthomass LawnSite Gold Member
    from N. VA
    Posts: 3,496

    Do you tow? What tires are you running? I've all terrains on both 2500's and they aren't worth a damn. I want grip for snow and the lesser reason, look. I need to rotate but these things aren't lasting. Is there an option besides a plain old radial?

    I know one business owner who said buy the cheapest tires you can find and just plan on replacing them every 2 yrs. Interesting.
     
  2. Summit L & D

    Summit L & D LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 269

    I agree with buying the cheap tires. It just makes sense to me, you never know what's going to happen to a tire on a construction site. I used to want all the tires on the trailers to match....HA...that was short lived!
     
  3. tthomass

    tthomass LawnSite Gold Member
    from N. VA
    Posts: 3,496

    I paid I think $150 each.
     
  4. P.Services

    P.Services LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,325

    For grip in snow you need as many leading edges as possible. That means the smaller the tread the better, the more sipping the better (that's the little tinny cuts in the tire) your all terains don't have many leading edges, but they do look cool. Pick what you want.
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  5. tthomass

    tthomass LawnSite Gold Member
    from N. VA
    Posts: 3,496

    A tire I can get a SOLID 30+k mile out of. 40k ideal and I know it depends on how much towing. My truck, not so much but the other truck tows whenever it moves (mowing).
     
  6. Fordsuvparts

    Fordsuvparts LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 518

    We run Firestone on a lot of our trucks and have had very good luck out of them. We just put 6 new 19.5 on our 2007 F450 Crew cab Dump
     
  7. Hanau

    Hanau LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,576

    I only buy tires from here: www.treadwright.com and I only buy the mud terrains. Great traction, great price, and I can get 35K miles out of a set on a dually. As many miles as I drive it doesn't make sense to spend more on tires that won't last longer. I've been doing business with them since they were called Hi-Tec. Unbeatable customer service.
     
  8. P.Services

    P.Services LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,325

    Mud terrains are always a big blocky tread. Great for mud but horrible in the snow. I plowed with bf goodrich mudders on a ram, horrible!!! Look sweeeeeeet though!!
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  9. Hanau

    Hanau LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,576

    Treadwrights are good in snow actually. The trick is to keep the tread clean, keep enough wheelspeed to clear the treads but not so much that you dig down. What I like is that there's plenty of shoulder grip in Treadwrights design. For me that makes the difference.

    They're awesome for chaining up too, I can really get that chain tight on that blocky tread. Chains don't move, which is very nice.

    Now for ice they kind of suck, not very much surface area due to the blocky tread. What I do is get em siped. Bruneel will sipe and install 4 tires for about $100. Is there a siping place in your town? If so i would highly recommend you do that. Then you'll have a great performing tire.
     
  10. DVS Hardscaper

    DVS Hardscaper LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,401

    For plowing I had aggressive tires (M/T) that I would put on in the winter and used A/T tires spring through fall. M/T tires are usually not designed for heavy loads by any stretch, nor do they come in an array of plys.

    Correct tire pressure is critical to the longevity of tire life. Correct load distribution also plays into it. I see millions of 1 ton trucks with the rear axle close to the cab, (known as cab to axle length). This does not properly distribute the weight to the front axle, so all the weight is riding on the rear axle. Not good for the rear tires and not safe for the truck. Yet, I bet 68% of landscape contractors have trucks with incorrect axle spacing.


    I have learned big name brand tires don't last very long. On the dump truck I use Kuhmos (spelling?), they're great tires and about $75 to $100 less than the name brands.
     

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