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Discussion in 'General Industry Discussions' started by MJ, Aug 23, 2005.

  1. MJ

    MJ LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 312

    I don't often visit Lawnsite, although I've been a member for about five years. I'm also "Mick" on Plow Site. This is a suggestion to advertisers pertaining to the importance of using correct spelling, punctuation, etc in your advertising and proofreading your appeals to the public. I had a message on my answering machine this morning which left a company name, contact name and telephone number. Since I was not familiar with the company, I checked out it's website. This was the first sentence: "More then 4,000 Green Industry suppliers and buyers drive their businesses with our technology resources."

    The word "then" refers to something past - clearly improper in this context. Obviously, it should be "than". I would question the use of the plural - "businesses". Since you apparently want to appeal to individuals, the use of the word "business" would show that your focus is on each, individual, manager or owner, not "your customers" as a group. But actually I couldn't get past the distraction of the improper word usage to get much more out of your message.

    Do you really expect me or anyone else to do business with someone who pays so little attention to detail?
  2. mcwlandscaping

    mcwlandscaping LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,164

    I agree with you 100%. If it looks like you have skimped on the proofreading, then the potential client will think that you might skimp on your work. Good topic to bring up in my opinion!
  3. Sean Adams

    Sean Adams LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,597

    this message can pertain to our users of the site in regard to how they present and promote their businesses as well... no one is perfect but you should make an effort to ensure your message is getting to the right people the right way... some of the smartest people I know are horrible spellers, etc... but that doesn't matter when it comes to advertising - you often get one chance to make a first impression - don't let it be with improper grammar, punctuation, spelling, etc.
  4. topsites

    topsites LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,653

    I believe the difference between proper and improper spelling affects business little to none so long that's all it is because in the end one doesn't need to know how to spell zymurgy in order to cut grass.

    In the end I always watch my spelling BUT I've seen many business owners who don't do it and really are not concerned. Should they be? I think not, at least not for such minor trifle.

    I visit a properly spelled Web site and do a View-source and then it turns out that although they know how to write english, they failed to learn proper coding techniques and errors and imperfections abound underneath where the true power lies. Meanwhile the kid who spells like hell has a kick-butt site which loads in under 8 seconds on a 56k dialup connection, delivers the content as promised and in not so many words, doesn't f*k around... Could it be the kid was wasting no time with it, concentrating instead on a fast load-time and an error-free, cross-browser compliant code the software could deliver without the usual hesitation? Of course in the original poster's example, I actually doubt the code was impressive as this is simply not the case with 90 percent of sites out there, whether proper grammar is used or not.

    Now one such bad-spelling Lco can always use the excuse that HE was busy learning the ropes while doing actual yardwork way back when all those who learned to spell were too busy paying attention in school so just because they can win a spelling bee doesn't mean they can take care of a yard.

    However, one SHOULD always try their best and then if a bit of grammar slips while doing your best now I don't feel there is much to worry about unless it's plain outrageous. In the example provided with that site, the errors are truly minor and in no way a sole indicator of anyone's ability BUT it might lead one to check a bit further, maybe. Now if the site belonged to a school that teaches English then that would be a different story.

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