TomG's Photos

Discussion in 'Hardscaping' started by TomG, Feb 7, 2011.

  1. DVS Hardscaper

    DVS Hardscaper LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,403

    Yes, everything works together. Its a system.

    Just like your body's muscles, they all work together and are reliant on one another.


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  2. wurkn with amish

    wurkn with amish LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 663

    Really who cares if the grid is there........ they could have used straw or feathers, if they sold it and it gives the customer peace of mind at night great! Its not hurting anything, the steps will be there for a long time, on to the next job.
     
  3. 2low4NH

    2low4NH LawnSite Bronze Member
    from NH
    Posts: 1,892

    Okay Grid holds soil not block. I can try and clear it up a little.

    1.Grid stabilizes soil
    2.Stabilized soil does not move
    3.good soil back fill aids in wall not moving.
    4.Tying grid in to block helps stabilize core fill
    5.Core fill helps stabilize the wall.
    6.core fill and stone back fill work in conjunction with grid to help stabilize the "system"
    7.System consists of block "veneer", Crushed stone 3/4" core fill and back fill, "crushed gravel" good compactable soil to spec. Grid running in layers at least past the 45* plain.
    Geo textiles under the base and "sometimes" behind the stone back fill. NCMA/ICPI/manufacturers all have their own method. follow the specs per your engineer/manufacturer.
    So does the grid hold the block NO it holds the fill in the block and behind the wall. will it aid in the wall not moving yes. In an engineered wall the block is solely a veneer.
     
  4. DVS Hardscaper

    DVS Hardscaper LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,403

    Exactly.

    I glanced over the pictures and noticed the grid and thought little of it.

    My initial response was in response to a response that Tom had provided when it was questioned by someone else. When I read his response I went back and looked to see what was going on in the picture.


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  5. DVS Hardscaper

    DVS Hardscaper LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,403

    To say the block
    Is "solely a veneer" is misleading. If that were the case:

    1) block would not have a batter
    2) you could build an engineered 10' wall with 3" Celtic block.
    3) would 60 to 110 pound block be needed?


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    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  6. 2low4NH

    2low4NH LawnSite Bronze Member
    from NH
    Posts: 1,892

    You get what i am saying. plain and simple walls dont hld back soil unless its a gravity wall
     
  7. JoeyDipetro

    JoeyDipetro LawnSite Member
    from CA
    Posts: 117

    Ok, I've read through this thread TOO many times.....again, I'm trying to learn. DVS, I thought you knew what you were talking about but it seems to me with the following quotes you were wrong and the other guys were right:

    After reading this thread, it seems there is a consensus that the grid does reinforce the soil. Also, I learned that there is a bi-axial grid that provides strength in two directions.

    2low, what is a "gravity" wall?
     
  8. a&jlandscaping

    a&jlandscaping LawnSite Member
    Posts: 61

    Nice work keep the pics coming
     
  9. 2low4NH

    2low4NH LawnSite Bronze Member
    from NH
    Posts: 1,892

    Gravity walls are non reinforced walls usually hav no grid they use the weight and size of the block for stability. they can go up to 4x the depth of the block most walls are 3-4 foot max height unless you use a redi-rock wall or similar. It is a lot of info to try and nderstand I can say take as many classes as you can from ICPI and NCMA Techo-bloc has a great program they put on. hands on is #1 though. A great builder can teach you many things.
     
  10. JoeyDipetro

    JoeyDipetro LawnSite Member
    from CA
    Posts: 117

    Thanks for the easy to understand explanation. After some of the other run around posts in this thread, I appreciate that. I do plan on taking the classes.
     

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