Too late for winter rye?

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by Blades of Steel, Dec 21, 2003.

  1. Blades of Steel

    Blades of Steel LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 599

    Is it too late to plant winter rye???? I have a client that wants her entire back yard done because there is not a blade od grass in it.

    Also should i lightly cover it with straw?
     
  2. olderthandirt

    olderthandirt LawnSite Platinum Member
    from here
    Posts: 4,900

    Plant the rye, You should'nt have much problems with it yet unless theres snow on the ground or it's froze.

    Merry Christmas

    Mac
     
  3. Blades of Steel

    Blades of Steel LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 599

    No snow, i am in the memphis area and we rarely get snow. Plus it has been in the 40's and 50's for the past week or so..
     
  4. Ryan Lightning

    Ryan Lightning LawnSite Senior Member
    from CA
    Posts: 554

    Maybe a compost would keep the seed warmer than straw, and help germination better?
     
  5. olderthandirt

    olderthandirt LawnSite Platinum Member
    from here
    Posts: 4,900

    If the weather stay like that it should be up in a wk or so, if it was me I would plant it I would not guarentee it but I take it she just does'nt want the mud. Hey if the weather changes you can always go back and straw it. Keep em happy

    Mac
     
  6. Pecker

    Pecker LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,454

    Be sure to use a perinial Rye. It is usually more expensive, but it is a shorter-growing, dryer type of grass.

    What NOT to put down: annual Rye grass (usually found in Lowe's, etc.). This type grows tall, stays wet, and grows fast. You will have to cut it every 3 or 4 days because I've seen it grow 8" in 1 week. It is, however, great for erosion resistance and you'll often see it on the side of a new enbankment of highways, etc. during the Winter months. So it is good for some things. But, NEVER put it on a lawn because it will smother out all other types of grass (even though she doesn't have any right now, it will ensure that nothing grows in the Spring either though).

    Please learn from my experience on this one (in my own yard / test-ground).
     
  7. olderthandirt

    olderthandirt LawnSite Platinum Member
    from here
    Posts: 4,900

    Blades
    When you say winter rye are you talking about the farmers type of ground cover or are you talking about Rye lawn seed? If your talking about lawn seed disregard all my previous post.

    Mac
     
  8. Blades of Steel

    Blades of Steel LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 599

    olderthandirt

    I am talking about a lawn with a serious slope and she has seeded in the past and it all ends up at the bottom. I will try the perinial rye and cover it with something. Haven't figured out exactly what to cover it with. I see that some say compost I am not sure about that yet. This yard is a freakin mess, I cut out 6 trees about 30' tall and removed about 2 seasons worth of leafs and branches. If I didn't know any better I would have thought i should have been deer hunting back there. Now the surface is exposed dirt and that is all. Absolutely no ground cover of any kind. So I thought I would plant the rye and then in early spring hit it hard with some fescue to get some sort of lawn back there. I will take some pictures in the morning and show you what I am talking about.

    Tim
     
  9. Pecker

    Pecker LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,454

    Hay could be applied lightly over the new seed to help keep it from washing down the slope.
     
  10. olderthandirt

    olderthandirt LawnSite Platinum Member
    from here
    Posts: 4,900

    buy the farmer's winter rye and cover the area heavy, mulch with straw. Next spring slice in any type of lawn seed that you want the winter rye will stop the erosion but it will die out late next spring. I just did a pond and over flow about a month ago in ohio and in a week had green and before the snow covered it it was looking real good as far as erosion was concerned. I also use it in road ditches that have water flowing through them. Put down some matting cover it with straw and put on a few # of the rye.

    Mac
     

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