Tool for leveling my existing lawn

Discussion in 'Homeowner Assistance Forum' started by JKeats, Jul 19, 2008.

  1. JKeats

    JKeats LawnSite Member
    Posts: 1

    I'm not sure where I heard about this before, but I figure if anyone is going to be able to help me, here is the place.

    I want to add a small bit of topsoil to my existing lawn to level out the little bumps and divots that seem to be all over the place. I know that in the spring I will be rolling the lawn to try to do some, but I was giving about 10 yards of clear topsoil and I want to fill in some large areas so rolling won't do it all.

    I don't know exactly how to make this item, but what I understood is if I have a piece of 2x4 or 2x6 or something, with a section of chain link fence and then another section of board, I can drag this behind my lawn tractor and this will distribute the soil across the length and smooth over the lawn.

    Can anyone tell me if this will work, and if you have pictures of such an item or better yet plans to make one, I would be very grateful.

    Thank you in advance for any and all help.
  2. Marcos

    Marcos LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,720

    ....not necessarily promoting this company or anything, but is something like what you're thinking? :
  3. PerfectEarth

    PerfectEarth LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,734

    A dragmat really does not work well in a lawn application where the turf is cut higher and the space might be restricted to drive around. It won't distribute topsoil that well and you need to pull it pretty quickly.

    I've used one quite a bit on already prepped ground (no grass) and in golf course applications on very short turf. Your topsoil will mound up on the mat and float over piles....I think it'll be a pain.
  4. ALC-GregH

    ALC-GregH LawnSite Fanatic
    from PA
    Posts: 7,053

    A drag mat will not work. You'll make a mess and waste time. The only way to do what your asking is to shovel and hand rake the entire area you want fixed.
    Your best bet would be wait until early September and rake in the top soil and over seed. Then this spring you should be able to roll the entire lawn in a few different directions to get any larger bumps knocked down. The soil needs to be "fluffy" and not packed if you want any seeding to take off and grow. It's a lot of manual labor thats for sure.

    One other option would be to cut the existing grass down to the dirt and bring in a skid loader and re-grade the lawn with more top soil, hand rake the rough areas out good and seed the entire area with the same seed. The lawn will look it's best if you can afford to do the later option as the entire lawn will most likely come from the same seed. These are just my opinion's and like everyone else, I have one. :D
  5. ALC-GregH

    ALC-GregH LawnSite Fanatic
    from PA
    Posts: 7,053

    The second option would be used if the lawn is in really bad condition with large bare dirt spots.
  6. WirelessG

    WirelessG LawnSite Member
    from MS
    Posts: 59

    I have the same problem, although mine is pretty bad. The guy that laid the sod arrived late and didn't have time to prep the ground. I have 38 pallets of St. Augustine on the ground. So far I've spread about 5 yards of topsoil and and sand. What if I over-aerated the lawn, watered it, then tried to roll it? My other thought was to get a hold of a spreader that could manage about a quarter yard of sand at a time, spread it evenly, and then come bakc with some sort of screed and fill in the low spots. The screed would need to have wheels on it so that it doesn't damage the turf.

    VWBOBD LawnSite Member
    Posts: 223

  8. LarryF

    LarryF LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,171

    Go buy a 4-foot aluminum landscaping rake. I have one I bought in 1964 about a week after buying my first house, even before I bought my first lawnmower. Didn't need a lawnmower at that time since none of the grass had come in yet, and the builder had done a terrible job of leveling my lot. No home should be without one. It looks like this.

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