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Topiary pruners

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by Accu-cut Lawn Care, Jan 13, 2007.

  1. Accu-cut Lawn Care

    Accu-cut Lawn Care LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,206

    I know you old school guys will tell me to use hand shears and scissors; but I'm a mechanized kind of guy that likes to use machines in order to get my jobs done. I currently use hs80's to do most of my pruning...but, they are kind of big and cumbersome to use on, say, hetz juniper spirals. I've seen some commercial looking cordless shears out there that look pretty cool. To you people that have employed them, how well do they work(charge capacity, sharpness,finished appearance)? If there is anything else out there on the market that you think will help, please let me know. Thanx!
  2. Grassmechanic

    Grassmechanic LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,697

    You answered your own question in the first sentence. I have yet to find any powered trimmer that will come close to the quality of hand shears or scissors. And I've been doing topiaries for over 20 years.
  3. Az Gardener

    Az Gardener LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,899

    Anything battery operated is going to be much heavier. Topiary are for the elite who can afford to have a guy with a pair of sheep shears or hand shears doing it by hand. Yes I am a plant snob. :laugh:
  4. bare spot

    bare spot LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,421

    can anyone recommend a good pair of hand shears, or who make them? thanks in advance.
  5. Dreams To Designs

    Dreams To Designs LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,406

    You can't go wrong with any of the Felco pruners. They make several different types to better fit hand size or lefties. The sheep shears have been a great addition to my pruning bucket over the past couple of years, but no named brands that I have found yet. Just picked up a 12" set of Fiskars loppers and they are a great addition when doing larger detail work.

  6. 93Chevy

    93Chevy LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 37,805

    I use Fiskars, but I've heard great things about Felco also.

    Can't go wrong if it starts with an "f"
  7. MarcSmith

    MarcSmith LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 7,157

    get some single or double bow hand sheep shears... best money you will ever spend make sure you get good ones with hollow ground blades. you hands don't get tired. but they are only good on the fresh young succulent growth...

    burgon and ball are the best. And can be found on ebay very cheap if you look ahrd enough

  8. bare spot

    bare spot LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,421

    thanks all for the help, wanna take a good look tonite at them. check out the burgon and ball site quickly this morning. look like some quality tools they make, and must be to be around for over 250 yrs. if was closer would be be neat to check out where and how they make them, in their site it said hand forged (if i read that right).
  9. MarcSmith

    MarcSmith LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 7,157

    if you have a bunch of antique stores or stores that claim to sell "antiques" you'll find them awfully easy I would imagine. especially if you are near farm/amish country
  10. bare spot

    bare spot LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,421

    marc, was thinking something like that today when i seen them on their site and remember seeing this type of shear in my neighbors basement long, long time ago, pretty sure it was them (funny looking shear at time). house is still there (same owner's) and now curious if still have so thinking of giving them a call to see if they are still around check em out again. will be looking though, if i'm out for a morn coffee etc. and see a yard sale going on, will be on the hunt.

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