Toro 230 Valve Diaphragm Kits?

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by AceSprinkleRx, Jul 29, 2005.

  1. AceSprinkleRx

    AceSprinkleRx LawnSite Member
    from Wyoming
    Posts: 95

    I have a customer with a number of Toro valves #230-06-04, the original installer is no longer around and he predominantly used these valves and the Toro 300 heads. He did do quite a few installs from what I everyone tells me so I know there are more of these out there.

    Yesterday I had a call from my client that one of his zones wouldn't shut down. After removing and cleaning the ports along with a quick inspection I did get the valve to run properly. But also started thinking it might be a good idea to have a few of these diaphragm/solenoid kits on hand when - and not if - I need them.

    I've made a few calls to supply houses and have looked online at a few supply stores with no luck. Is this a valve which will mandate a replacement and not a repair? If any of you have a line on some of these would you please post or PM? Thanks.

    ~
     
  2. irrigationsup

    irrigationsup LawnSite Member
    Posts: 12

    Ace
    I have never ran across a 230 toro valve could it possibly be a 280 if it is that is a old flo-pro valve. You can purchase alot of old discontinued or after market parts from The Source or RCo in california
    Jason
     
  3. Broker

    Broker LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 382

    jason,

    never knew you had such a depth of knowledge.

    bob
     
  4. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 48,017

    The Toro 230 series of valve evolved into the 250 series, and shares many of the parts. Easiest would be to buy some of the new Toro valves, and swap out the guts. The solenoids are the same, but the diaphragm assemblies will be a bit different. If you had the room in the valve box, you could use a flow-control Toro valve as a parts source, and have the repaired valve adjustable for improved operation.

    By the way, the part number for the old diaphragm assembly is 35-3503
     
  5. irrigationsup

    irrigationsup LawnSite Member
    Posts: 12

    Ace that must be an old valve we have manuals from 1981 for present from toro. Ive looked through them all the only one i know of that might have those parts is R Co or The Source.Good Luck Jason
    Bob i guess my knowlege well is not that deep
     
  6. AceSprinkleRx

    AceSprinkleRx LawnSite Member
    from Wyoming
    Posts: 95

    Thanks for all the help guys! Much appreciated as always!

    ~
     
  7. Guthrie&Co

    Guthrie&Co LawnSite Senior Member
    from nc
    Posts: 784

    thats is part of the reson why toro is considered the red headed step child of irrigation.
     
  8. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 48,017

    If you can fix a 25-year old valve with the guts of a present-day valve, that speaks well of Toro. You can't blame them for making a design change or two, especially if they improve the product, and maintain serviceability of older valves while they're at it. Try fixing a 25-year old Hunter valve. (Oh wait, there aren't any)
     
  9. Guthrie&Co

    Guthrie&Co LawnSite Senior Member
    from nc
    Posts: 784

    I am not telling you that toro doesnt make a good product it is just that they are so diffrent from the others. nothing interchanges with them. which could be seen as a good thing or bad. i personally dont like them because that are so diffrent.
     
  10. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 48,017

    I don't have much to criticize old Toro 230 or 250 valves about. They were about as reliable as most of the early plastic sprinkler valves. I never loved having to remove the solenoid separately, when changing a diaphragm, and the valves were so slow-closing when manually opened, using the bleed screw, that I couldn't use the bleed screws when winterizing with the little truck-mounted air compressor. I usually tried to get flow-control bonnets on them, when I did repairs. I do tip the gimme cap to Toro for keeping the older Richdel valve designs in production, to assure their serviceability in years to come.

    If you want some weird in your control valves, you want to check out old brass zone valves. All kinds of great (ha-ha) engineering.
     

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