Toro Dingo - Soil Cultivator or Harley Rake?

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by Brian M, Feb 29, 2008.

  1. Brian M

    Brian M LawnSite Member
    from CT
    Posts: 94

    Using a Toro Dingo for lawn renovations.

    I'm looking for opinions from those who have used the soil cultivator and the harley rake on the Dingo (or similar mini) for lawn renovations.

    What are the pros and cons of each?

    I've used the Harley rake and know there could be a lot of debris that has to be removed and hauled away, but I have yet to try the soil cultivator.

    I have seen from several posts here that there is little or no debris to be removed when using the cultivator, is that really the case?

    Any problems with the expanded metal roller, like getting clogged, filling with soil, or difficult to adjust the proper ground pressure to achieve the dimpled finished surface???

    What ground conditions can create a problem for either attachments, i.e.: does the soil have to be completely dry, is there a lot of clumps left behind, does one level better than the other, can either of them truly remove existing lawns and leave a leveled seed bed in one pass? etc,etc,etc.



    Any and all opinions or advice would be appreciated.
     
  2. Keystone

    Keystone LawnSite Member
    Posts: 43

    They are two different tools for different jobs.The cultivator is a tiller that wiil leave dry ground fluffed and level to a certain extent and bury most grass and gravel,rocks,etc. Wet ground will be clumpy unless the blade is raised all the way and the roller can get clogged if too much pressure is applied in wet conditions.Also the tilled ground will need to settle for a while and god forbid you get any rain in between cultivating and laying sod.If the rule are followed this a great tool. The rake can be used to remove turf but it takes a little more time and you have debris to remove in the end.The rake is a better grading tool for uneven surfaces, cutting swales, or removing rocks and can dry a site pretty fast by getting the soil moving. If it rains in between prep and sod just run it again and dry the area then you are ready to go. Hope this helps.
     
  3. Brian M

    Brian M LawnSite Member
    from CT
    Posts: 94

    Anyone else!!!
     
  4. cgaengineer

    cgaengineer LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 15,783

    Harley rake for sure. I rented the tracked Dingo last year along with the Harley Rake and it worked great...almost unstoppable on compacted GA red clay, rocks...no problem, it either ditched them to the side if small or busted them up into smaller pieces to be picked up.
     
  5. Brian M

    Brian M LawnSite Member
    from CT
    Posts: 94

    Can anyone else who has used the Soil Cultivator offer some input here?
     
  6. yardmanlee

    yardmanlee LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 898

    used one a couple of weeks ago but it did not have the roller on it (rental) but it did a good job tilling up existing sod then we raked the left over sod , hauled it off and resodded
     
  7. Mr. Vern

    Mr. Vern LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 632

    I've used the Harley rake and it works exceptionally well as described above. I have been wanting to try the soil cultivator but have not had the chance. I had the opportunity to pick up a good used tiller attachment this winter and we were all in awe of what it can do. I sincerely doubt that we will ever use the Barrettos or the Troybuilts ever again after using this. It will turn hard dry clay to fine powder in one pass. Grading is a breeze after one pass with this thing. You can barely see any remnants of the sod that was there.
    I have been seeing quite a few of these used on Ebay lately and for the price they are a bargain - nothing like any tiller I have ever seen before. Much more like I would have expected from the soil cultivator but just without the roller wheel.
    The only issue I see with the Harley rake is that it is a single application type of tool. With the cultivator or the tiller you can use it for many more applications.
     

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