Toro golf-course heads...

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by mcclureandson, Jan 12, 2008.

  1. mcclureandson

    mcclureandson LawnSite Member
    Posts: 242

    We're finishing up the install of a Berkely 2 h.p multi-stage pump for an HOA - (1 1/2" main - 1" laterals - 2 zones of Rainbird 5006's/1806's w/mp rotators off 1 1/2" Rainbird PGA's) and part of the job required a couple of bores under the neighborhood streets...while we're there they hire us to bore another street for an adjacent HOA. These guys have an irrigation contractor tying a secondary entrance into a golf course's system (multi-stage pumphouse but I've no idea of the system specs or capabilities). During the course of the conversation I learned they plan on cutting in a tee off the nearest Toro head (not sure the series - typical of other I've seen on the course) and using that to feed valves for the addition. I was skeptical for obvious reasons and the guy told me each head had it's own valve and the lines up to each head were always under pressure...is golf course irrigation so different than the commercial/residentials I do everyday? What could the advantage be to having so much linear feet of charged mainline? I believe just the opposite should be true. I've always assumed the major differences were in design and scale...but how are they getting around poc - valve (or master) - head ?
     
  2. They can pick and choose the heads they want to run. Sometimes they'll water while golfers are playing and randomly choose heads far apart to allow golfers to play through.
     
  3. mcclureandson

    mcclureandson LawnSite Member
    Posts: 242

    How? I understand the control/initiation aspect but how is the pipe configured?
     
  4. Dirty Water

    Dirty Water LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,794

    Pipe is configured much like a constant on quick connect system would be done.

    Remember, those toro valve in heads can be pushing 75-100 gpm. they aren't your usual PGP.
     
  5. It is just a continuous main line......Each head has it own valve, and they can wire a few valve in heads together Ie: 3 or 4
     
  6. mcclureandson

    mcclureandson LawnSite Member
    Posts: 242

    You learn something new everyday - obviously never done any golf-course irrigation. We do maybe 30 small 6-8 zone systems a year (along with the occasional larger commercial proect and landscape/hardscape installs) and I assumed design principles were similar...any good books out there on golf course irrigation design/install? I've got two amenity projects for one of our developers later this year (entries/common areas) and they're both part of new golf courses. I've got the man-power and equipment (if 8 guys - 2 trenchers - 1 boring unit is enough) so I might try and get involved with that side of the project too.
     
  7. zman9119

    zman9119 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 758

    If anyone is interested, here is a basic layout of new golf course irrigation system for one hole. I have added notes on what everything is. This is from a course built in 2004-2005 in Illinois. If you have any questions, let me know!



    (Sorry for the size, PDF 2.70mb)
     

    Attached Files:

  8. txgrassguy

    txgrassguy LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,083

    Large scale irrigation systems used on a golf course is most assuredly NOT a continuous mainline. Especially one of the same size.
    Pressure, volume, type of material, and degree of precipitation are all highly controlled. There is a reason why many millions of dollars have been spent in developing software for effective systems operation.
    Not only does accurate precipitation rate impact on the relative health of the turfgrass, there are HUGE economic concerns regarding the installation, maintenance and operation of a golf course system.
    Prior to operating my own company I ran and built golf courses here in the States and in several Asian countries - and designed/supervised the install of systems pushing over 7,000 gallons of water per minute.
    What that one developer is suggesting by tying into a lateral too irrigate a residential turfsite is possible but you HAVE to watch the pressure and volume from the lateral feeding the site.
    Residential heads are designed to operate efficiently at around 50 or psi which isn't enough pressure regardless of the volume to adequately operate a large volume head on a golf course - unless custom designed nozzles are used.
    For instance, the last system I installed had over 350,000 linear feet of pipe, the pump station main discharge was 12" and the pump station was producing over 170 psi at peak discharge.
    The lowest volume/pressure lateral had 200 gpm at 97 psi over a MILE away from the station and it ran only seven heads.
    My point is not to discourage anyone from large area irrigation but you begin to tread in the realm of hydraulic engineers and systems costing upwards of $700,000 per nine holes.
    If you are interested, definitely work for some one/company first and see if you like it.
    I got out because of the constraints placed on work scheduling, work performance, financial hassles and the constant crap me and the other construction/grow-in superintendents had to deal with on literally an hourly basis.
    I'm not kidding, the only god damned gray hair I have ever gotten was as a result of the pressures on building courses - hell even my ex-wife shooting at me was easier to take.
     
  9. mcclureandson

    mcclureandson LawnSite Member
    Posts: 242

    That's a great reply...and it highlights a couple of the concerns I raised when this developer revealed his plan. Before adding onto any system I explained they should understand available water/pressure and design accordingly...they've already contracted someone to run 400' of 1" 160psi pvc and connect into an existing system of mixed rotors/sprays off 1" residential valves. I explained the differences in operating pressure, valve tolerances etc...they feel 'there's plenty of pressure and it'll work fine'. Also, it sounds like I might not have an easy transition into golf course irrigation - but I guess you never know.
     
  10. Never hurts to stick with what you know. I wear my Dinky Pipe badge with pride.
     

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