Toro proline 21" loose front wheels

Discussion in 'Mechanic and Repair' started by z_clark, Apr 23, 2006.

  1. z_clark

    z_clark LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 369

    Have a fleet of nine toro 21"s. It seems that after about 200 hours of use the front wheels get loose and move up and down when raising the front to make turns.

    I assume the only solution is tightening the bolt after you take the wheel off. BUT.....it is almost impossible to keep the socket wrench on the bolt, as you have to put LOTS of pressure on them to get them to tighten. This results in busted knuckles.... :cry: :angry:

    Is there a better way? Any way to prevent this???
     
  2. lucforce

    lucforce LawnSite Member
    Posts: 223

    "after about 200 hours of use"

    Are you actually complaining about having to tighten a couple of bolts every 200 hours?

    Most small walk behinds never make it this far to begin with.

    You have quality machinery, do what it takes to keep it going.
     
  3. Restrorob

    Restrorob LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,023

    Are you referring to applying pressure to keep the socket on the thin headed bolt ?
     
  4. z_clark

    z_clark LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 369

    Lucforce - not very helpful....I am not complaining, these are great machines...I just need advice on tightening these bolts, or ways to make them not need tightening.

    Restorb - Yeah, the dang wrench pops off these shallow bolts...is there a fix? Am I doing something wrong??? LOTS of force is needed to turn these bolts, not to mention the pain of getting a hold of the nut on the other side at the same time.

    Help! Thanks! :waving:

    PS: These are comercial toro prolines. Built well, with exeption of these front wheels, and the handel attachement. We get 1000 hours+ on these easy.
     
  5. dutch1

    dutch1 LawnSite Silver Member
    from Jayhawk
    Posts: 2,231

    Are you referring to the wheel bolts or the pivot arm bolts? From my experience it is normally the pivot arm bolts which loosen first. First, examine the spring arms for wear, particularly where the spring arm engages the notches in the height adjuster. Replace the spring arms if necessary. If the pivot arm is loose on the bolt, replace both. When installing the bolt and pivot arms use some blue locktite on the threads and tighten with an impact not a ratchet. It seems reasonable that with a fleet of Toro commercials you would have a stock pile of parts on hand along with a rechargable electric impact.

    Dutch
     
  6. z_clark

    z_clark LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 369

    Thanks Dutch!

    Yeah, I didn't even think of an impact wrench....duuuh....I have a compressor, but no impact wrench....I know that sounds stupid. I need to invest in one.

    I do have quite a few extra parts, but mainly just throttle cables / belts / transmissions. Thanks again.

    Any other advice?
     
  7. Restrorob

    Restrorob LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,023

    Take a six point socket and grind the tapper area out of the bottom, This will get the socket over the bolt fully.
     
  8. dutch1

    dutch1 LawnSite Silver Member
    from Jayhawk
    Posts: 2,231

    If you get to the point where the rear spring arms do not want to stay engaged and you replace spring arms, save the old spring arms and cut them off at the first bend and install them between the wear cup and the new spring arm to take up excessive end play in the transmission drive shaft.

    Dutch
     
  9. lucforce

    lucforce LawnSite Member
    Posts: 223

    "not very helpful....I am not complaining, these are great machines...I just need advice on tightening these bolts, or ways to make them not need tightening."

    I did not intend to sound nasty, but we are only talking about tightening a couple of bolts.

    When these things get tipped back to turn and then dropped on their front wheel for, say 200 hours, something is boing to give. Nearly every one of these that I ever saw brought in to a shop had loose front wheels and/or height adjusters. It takes three minutes to tighten them. It is just part of the deal.
     
  10. Roger

    Roger LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,927

    After using my Toro Proline for awhile and trying to keep the nut tight, but not too tight so as to make an adjustment difficult (I make height adjustments often), I used a double nut. This way, I can tighten the bolt so that it is tight enough to eliminate slop, but not too tight so that I can still make height adjustments. The lock nut I got was a thin one, but it works fine and eliminated any further problem with those bolts. In my opinion, it is a poor design -- trying to keep a bolt tight enough to eliminate slop, but not too tight so the part can rotate over the bolt -- bad design.
     

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