Towing F350 with F350

Discussion in 'Trucks and Trailers' started by PGold, Feb 12, 2007.

  1. PGold

    PGold LawnSite Member
    from biloxi
    Posts: 53

    My truck got towed tonight by an F350. I had the truck backed into a space, so the only possible way I can think of that the truck can be moved is by dragging the back wheels. I am not around tow trucks often, so I don't know if they have a solution to keep the back wheels from dragging. I saw tire marks on the ground, but I don't know if they are from my truck or previous vehicles. I saw my truck when it was leaving and it was being towed by a flat-bed f350. It seems like my truck plus the weight of the flat bed would put him way over limit. Is that the case?
     
  2. lwcmattlifter

    lwcmattlifter LawnSite Senior Member
    from NC
    Posts: 859

    Usually they will drag the truck as is. I watched one get "snatched" and the driver pulled it about 50 feet until the trans park rod or the gear set broke. Once it breaks the truck rolls free. If the tow truck was towing (not hauling) your truck he was well within his GVWR or GCVWR
     
  3. xcopterdoc

    xcopterdoc LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 752

    Whay was the reason for towing like that? Repo? Stolen?? Most companies will remove the drive shaft if they have to tow it on the rear tires.
     
  4. Uranus

    Uranus LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Mass
    Posts: 1,624

    Repos will slowly drag your vehicle to a safe spot if they cant grap and go. They bring it down the street or to the other side of parking lots and let it go and hook up to the other side to tow it. Like said before if he was towing it with one set of wheels in the air then he is fine. The F 350 tow truck has a higher gvw then a regular factory f 350.
     
  5. J&R Landscaping

    J&R Landscaping LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,096

    They can wheel lift it out of the spot if it is a standard wrecker or rollback. If its a self loader, the can pick it out of the spot and either re hook to the rear axle or just pop the drive shaft off. Removing the driveshaft is easy, takes about 3 minutes.
     
  6. mrusk

    mrusk LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,260

    Can't wait to hear the rest of this story!
     
  7. cutbetterthanyou

    cutbetterthanyou LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,178

    I drove a tow truck for my dads shop before lawn care. I did it alot too much actually thats is why i do lawn care but thats another story.If the driver knowns what he is doing or cares your truck can be loaded safely w/ out damage but yes it will drag the tires . The correct way is to-1 hook up to your truck (with your truck in gear or parking brake on so the back wheels don't move but the front can)2 tilt the bed of the tow truck up with your front tires on the back of the bed 3 with the cable tight take the e brake off off the tow truck 4 winch the tow truck under your truck until the edge of the bed touches your back tires 5 the tow truck driver then can drag your truck 1-2 feet up on to the bed and chain it. This is how you tow something w/ no keys correctly w/ a rollback.if there was a wrecker or something w/ i wheel lift they shouldn't have dragged u at all. Although we didn't tow alot of heavy things i would say he probably isn't over the limit
     
  8. PGold

    PGold LawnSite Member
    from biloxi
    Posts: 53

    It being hauled, not towed. I parked in a tow away zone. I knew it was not a good idea, but I figured if I backed into the spot, they wouldn't be able to tow it. I didn't think they would just drag the rear tires across the ground. I was looking for an excuse to not pay and assumed that they were illegally towing my truck by putting it on their flat bed f350. I assume my truck weighs about 6000 pounds or more plus the weight of their flatbed. I wouldn't think an f350 would be allowed to carry 7,500 pounds, but maybe so. My B&W hitch is rated for a 7500 pound load in the bed, so maybe they were barely within limit. I just got the truck back and the tow fee was only 50 dollars, so I don't really care if they towed it illegally. Maybe next time they will drop it and their insurance will buy me a 6.0. :weightlifter:
     
  9. zedosix

    zedosix LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,628

    Do you think your parking pass would of been cheaper than $50.00 :)
     
  10. d&rlawncare

    d&rlawncare LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 741

    They were well within any WEIGHT limits set by state law. As far as what that vehicle is designed to haul. YES again they were within those limits as well. You cant tell anyone what they should or should not haul going on what there truck is RATED for. The rating just covers fords butt. Now if they got into a bad accident then a good lawyer will eat them alive if they were over the truck Rating. Here in MI that 2 axle flatbed tow truck gets 35,400 pound total weight. His empty weight is maybe 15,000 plus your 8000.

    If I stop a 2 axle dump that weighs 28,000. 9000 on front steer axle and 19,000 on the rear axle. No weight violations even though the truck is rated for 26,000 pounds. The COMPANY is taking a risk overloading the truck over its rating. There will be more wear and tear on all the leaf springs, brakes, etc. If that truck is involved in an accident and I come do an inspection it gets noted on the inspection: the weight of the truck AND the rating of the truck. I have had lawyers use that as a case against many companies. They normally win due to the fact that the truck is not designed to haul that much weight.

    Thats why ford sticks the rating stickers on the truck. It keeps them out of court.
     

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