Tracked AG tractors

Discussion in 'Heavy Equipment & Pavement' started by Dirty Water, May 28, 2006.

  1. Dirty Water

    Dirty Water LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,799

    I just got back from Spokane, and while driving through Eastern WA on I-90 I noticed how many tracked tractors they were using in the huge fields out there. I was wondering if anyone knew why they were using tracked over rubber tired over there?

    The slopes aren't that bad. I figured going around and around for 12 hours a day would really wear out the under carraige?
     
  2. Tigerotor77W

    Tigerotor77W LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Germany
    Posts: 1,891

    Tracked tractors are usually used for softer soils where the imprint of a 4WD would be bad for the crops.
     
  3. janb

    janb LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 254

    Heres a link to an AG guy I worked with, (driving semi / tractor / combine) there are lots of pics in the links, and a good fleet of Case "Quads" on this page, when all the neighbors showed up to help plant. (After Doug did a Late night 'end-o' off his quad and broke his neck) Hills are important reason for tracks here...

    http://www.mcgg.net/index.cfm?show=10&mid=20&pid=8

    Low ground pressure is key + traction... dragging a 50'-80' wide implement
    We use them in Illinois so we can get into really wet stuff. These articualted Case rigs are major improvement over CAT Ag Tractors, as these don't leave 'Divots' and ... the JD and Stieger Articulated Tractors can only farm going 'downhill' on the steep stuff... Even when mounted with flotation 'duals' 4x4. The trick stuff I was able to do with the Quad was towing a 'Bank-out' Wagon with 50,000# of grain down a 45deg slope. It had a 'jake' and all electronic shifting. The bad deal was when it errored out and the guy had to drive 100 miles to plug in his laptop for 30 seconds. (time for satellite repairs) Of course topping off the 300 gal fuel tank can set you back a bit :dizzy:
     
  4. Squizzy246B

    Squizzy246B LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 837

    I remember going to our states biggest field day some years ago. They wheeled out the most powerful, 4 wheel drive articulated tractor in Australia at the time (I think a Steiger about 440hp). The hooked it onto a 40ft wide deep ripper and drove it into some firm loam. It went about 20 feet and ran out of power. It then ran out of traction with lower gears. They then uncoupled and hooked up Australia's first Challenger tracked machine. It was 230 Hp and it just walked away with the deep ripper like it wasn't even working.

    In our sandy areas its common to see 15 - 18% slippage (wheelspeed versus speed over the ground) or even more with rubber tyred machines. With the Challengers on sand wheel slip is like 2.5%. Thats a lot of diesel saved.
     
  5. Tigerotor77W

    Tigerotor77W LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Germany
    Posts: 1,891

    And potentially better track life as well.

    But like all good things, tracked tractors are not for everyone. You should consult your doctor or physici *cough*:hammerhead:
     
  6. jazak

    jazak LawnSite Senior Member
    from NJ
    Posts: 843

    Have any pics of those challangers?:)
     
  7. Dirty Water

    Dirty Water LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,799

    The machines I saw were all Cats, they looked similar to a D9 Dozer or so, but with no blade and a hitch on the back. They were pulling HUGE attachments.

    All Steel tracked, not like those articulated CASE tractors with rubber tracks.
     
  8. Squizzy246B

    Squizzy246B LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 837

  9. ksss

    ksss LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 7,126

    CASE really hit the nail on the head with their articulated tracked machines. There is no comparison between the four wheel tracks verse the two track systems of Deere and CAT/AGCO. They don't leave scrub marks in the field as noted and they are much more comfortable to run as each track can articulate independently. The only issue is they are only offered on the large tractors. Deere and Agco offer their version in the smaller 225 and under Hp class machines. The CASE machines are very popular with the construction scraper industry as well.
     
  10. wanabe

    wanabe LawnSite Senior Member
    from So. IL
    Posts: 943

    Ya, just watch all the Case owners cry when the undercarage is gone! I have seen some even enquire if the final drives are the same as the tired models so they can put wheels on as a cheeper option! I would rather have a new MT series cat with 55o Hp.
     

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