Trailer for Skid Sprayer

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by GravelyGuy, Jan 20, 2008.

  1. GravelyGuy

    GravelyGuy LawnSite Silver Member
    from Indiana
    Posts: 2,517

    As my other post shows I just picked up a 200 gal. skid spray. It weighs around 550 dry and around 2200 full. I don't really want to put this in my truck because it would take up the entire bed and it's surpasses my payload capacity. I'm sure it would be fine with SuperSprings, but I need to keep my bed open.

    I am thinking of picking up a small 10-12' trailer and use it as my spray trailer only. I would like to keep my sprayer inside when not being used so this would mean either putting it in my garage when not in use or picking a small enclosed trailer for spraying only. I would also like to be able to keep some of my fert. etc in the trailer and get it out of my way in my garage.

    One more thing, I love my 16' landscape trailer that I have now and I even thought of mounting it on that somehow. I can't figure out a way to do it where tongue weight wouldn't be an issue. I don't think the trailer would track very well with 2200 lbs. up by the tongue and no weight in the back. This trailer is already lettered with my biz name.

    Please give me any suggestions you may have and pics of your setup if you would like. I can post a pics of my trialer if you have any ideas.

    Thanks...:)
     
  2. RAlmaroad

    RAlmaroad LawnSite Silver Member
    from SC
    Posts: 2,173

    Consder buy another late model 1ton Chevy truck. You could mount the tank, which you'll probably upgrade to a larger tank later, leave it and still have room to use truck for other jobs. But an independent trailer is good also, probably get it made with overload springs less than cost of truck. I have a friend with a ENCLOSED trailer for sale. If interested let me know or check out here: http://www.lawnsite.com/showthread.php?t=194184&highlight=trailer
     
  3. GravelyGuy

    GravelyGuy LawnSite Silver Member
    from Indiana
    Posts: 2,517

    PM sent.

    I don't want to buy another truck. Old trucks are to much of a headache for me right now. I have no place to work on them. I have two truck right now and that's all I want. Thanks for the help.
     
  4. Runner

    Runner LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,496

    A 10 to 12' trailer wouldn't do it anyway, as you are going to need a tandem axle trailer not just because of the weight, but you need the stability in towing. The idea of a dedicated truck is always the best, because you will find how much easier it is to get in and out of places - especially tight parking lots that you may have to maneuver around to spray. Sometimes, budget wise, a separate trailer may be the way for some, though. I once thought I was going to go this route. One thing about a 16 ft'.? You will have room for fertilizer and other supplies (actually a 14' tandem provides this - enough for sprayer, and enough for a pallet. you are tight for other chems and supplies, though (bp sprayer(s), bp blower, etc.).
     
  5. Mountain Gardener

    Mountain Gardener LawnSite Member
    Posts: 79

    We have a 5X10' single axle trailer with a 200 gal rig mounted on it and pull with our 3/4T pickup. Never have had a problem pulling this setup. All other materials/equipment is put in the bed of pickup. Be sure you have enough trailer and axle for your rig.
     
  6. Mountain Gardener

    Mountain Gardener LawnSite Member
    Posts: 79

    We have a 5X10' single axle trailer with a 200 gal rig mounted on it and pull with our 3/4T pickup. Never have had a problem pulling this setup. All other materials/equipment is put in the bed of pickup. Be sure you have enough trailer and axle for your rig.
     
  7. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,904

    I should mention that a friend, put a little extra stress on his spray trailer tongue when he was turning it around in a tight spot. Five minutes later he hit a bump and the tongue broke in half. The sprayer contained a few gallons of diazinon solution. The safety chains were attached near the hitch which remained attached to the truck. The trailer rolled over a couple of times--spilled most of the diazinon. Destroyed the reel. Lucky he had the safety chains, and a spill kit which absorbed some of the diazinon. The law went easy on him. He had to dig out some of the contaminated soil in the nearest lawn and reseed the spot.
     
  8. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,904

    My sprayer on the back of my pickup stays out in the weather all the time--no problem. However all sprayers need this. I suggest you build a stainless steel shield over the motor--otherwise rain plus the liquid and grass that collects on the hose drips off the reel of hose and drops onto the motor and pump, which are eventually damaged. Even more rust prone if you mix fertilizer with the spray. An enclosed trailer needs heat and exhaust ventilation of course.
     
  9. ted putnam

    ted putnam LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,533

    Mine does as well. I had a 14x6 tandem axle trailer built in 2004 by a local mfg.It has a side gate and a rear gate. I centered my 300 gal tank over the axles. I can slide a pallet of fert in the side gate or pull my ATV with sprayer in or pull my PG in. 90% of the time it's my PG that in there. There is a tongue box for all of my insecticides/fungicides and tip-n-pours. I love it. One drawback. is hard to get to properties. I throw my bags of fert in the back of the F-250 I haul it with. My second rig is a Westheffer space saver 300 that I have in the back of a chevy 2500 hd. I use it on those hard to get to lawns. Both have their advantages and drawbacks
     
  10. Runner

    Runner LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,496

    That was sort of my point, was that a tandem axle just pulls SO much smoother and stable than a single axle trailer that shimmys and bounces more. 1600 lbs. is alot to put on a single axle and two wheels. This is let alone the weight of the sprayer unit itself and any fertilizer.
     

Share This Page