1. Missed the live Ask the Expert event?
    Not to worry. Check out the archived thread of the Q&A with Ken Hutcheson, President of U.S. Lawns, and the LawnSite community on the Franchising Forum.

    Dismiss Notice

Trailer tongue weight confusion

Discussion in 'Mechanic and Repair' started by BRIAN GALLO, Mar 31, 2002.

  1. BRIAN GALLO

    BRIAN GALLO LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 282

    I have some confusion on this subject. I have a 12' long single axle trailer rated at 2000#. The deal is, the coupler and ball are rated @ 200lb max tongue weight. I was told that the tongue weight is 10% of your max trailer capacity. Now the deal is I decided to check this out, so I put a scale under the trailer jack and put 1 walk - behind on the trailer. The reading went off the scale - way over 250# at the tongue with just one 450# walk behind! This was however with the machine pulled all the way forward, which is where you would normally put it. My question is, do you have to try to carry everything over the axle to keep the tongue weight down, or are those "max" ratings unrealistic? :confused:
     
  2. ADLAWNCUTTERS

    ADLAWNCUTTERS LawnSite Member
    Posts: 191

    as long as you have a good hitch .don't worry about it. try to keep the heavy stuff over the axle. a couple of walk behinds you'll be fine. good luck.
     
  3. Remo Sid

    Remo Sid LawnSite Member
    from USA
    Posts: 55

    You should place the load to where the balance point is slightly ahead of the axle(s). That will make your trailer carry the load, and conform to the rated capicity of your hitch. It will also keep you within the law.


    SmallEngineRepairHelp

    Remo
     
  4. Shady Brook

    Shady Brook LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Indiana
    Posts: 1,517

    With 2 walkbehinds alone, you may be over loading the trailer if it is rated at 2000lb gvw! I don't know how wide the trailer is, but if you are not overloaded with the equipment you own, if you put the two walkbehinds back to back, you may balance her out so that you do not overload the tonge. I would make sure to have some good safty chains as back up. 200lb tonge weight does not allow for much at all. Maybe you need a new hitch and trailer or at least coupler. Think of the ballastic forces that you incur hitting bumps and such in the road, that 200 + lb load can be magnified to a very heavy load that could jeporadize the safty of those on the road with you. Better Safe then sorry.

    Jay
     
  5. BRIAN GALLO

    BRIAN GALLO LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 282

    If I put 2 walk behinds on I will only be @ 1000#, which is still under weight for the trailer. I am however going to remove the 1 7/8" coupler & ball and replace them with 2" ones. I am also going to weld my safety chains to the tongue for extra support (they are currently held on with one bolt). I am very safety concious about these sorts of things. Thanks for the info.
     
  6. Shady Brook

    Shady Brook LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Indiana
    Posts: 1,517

    Glad you are making some changes. I thought you said your trailer was 2000 GVW, or at least that was my impression. Maybe you ment payload. My 14 trailer is heavy duty, and weighs in at 3,000 by itself. I figured the trailer may approach 1,000 anyway, plus a couple mowers and odds and ends would send you over the 2,000 mark. Looks like you have things undercontrol. Have a super season! :)

    Jay
     
  7. Remo Sid

    Remo Sid LawnSite Member
    from USA
    Posts: 55

    Trailers do not have a GVWR. They have a TWR, and a PWR just as was stated, 2000#. Its hard to believe a 14 foot trailer that ways 3000# by itself. What do you pull this monster with?
     
  8. Shady Brook

    Shady Brook LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Indiana
    Posts: 1,517

    "What do you pull this monster with?"

    Anything I want! :D
    Seriously it does have lots of steel, with a large cage on the front to haul gas cans and such. It is really a monster, nothing like those Beaver Creek lawncare trailers.

    Aside from my lawn care equipment, sometimes I haul some big oak sections. It was built by a fella that builds bob cat trailers and such, and he made it to haul about whatever you could get on her. It has 2 5,000 lb axles as well. I am very happy with the beast, my Powerstroke pulls her just fine too.:D
     
  9. DaveK

    DaveK LawnSite Member
    Posts: 84

    Remo Sid
    Maybe not the little trailers. But any trailer that can handle carrying a skidsteer certainly does.
    The Hudson trailer I use has a GVWR of 18,000 lbs. and a GVW of nearly 5,000 lbs. The F550 power stroke that pulls it only requires a chaufers license (as a comercial vehicle), but to tow the trailer (even empty) you need a class A CDL (yea, the same that is needed to drive the biggest semi) The only difference is that an air brake endorsement isn't needed, since it has electric brakes.
     
  10. Remo Sid

    Remo Sid LawnSite Member
    from USA
    Posts: 55

    And what were we talking about Dave? Hauling lawnmowers on utility trailers, or skidders. Where I live ( Alabama) anything under 26,000# can be operated with an ordinary liscense.
     

Share This Page