transplant a maple tree

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by bobcatnj, Nov 11, 2007.

  1. bobcatnj

    bobcatnj LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 687

    is it 2 late to transplant a 10 ft high maple tree in central nj? or when is the best time?
     
  2. Rtom45

    Rtom45 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 456

    It is not too late, go ahead and move it.
     
  3. Dreams To Designs

    Dreams To Designs LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,406

    Maples are typically not a fall dig hazard, so you should be ok with proper digging and planting techniques. Dig as big a ball as you can handle to get the most amount of roots and prep the hole twice as wide and make sure to water in the newly planted tree. Insure a good coat of mulch, keeping it away from the trunk to discourage vole damage and water frequently and well. We usually have more precipitation than this year, so install a tree gator or water it deeply & regularly.

    Kirk
     
  4. grasswhacker

    grasswhacker LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,873

    I would wait until late Feb. or early March before it leafs out. Transplanting now would not allow the root system to get established after the shock of removal from existing spot.
    Now if you were planting a new tree, now would be great.
     
  5. Marbleman

    Marbleman LawnSite Member
    Posts: 14

    The first question I would ask is what kind of maple is it. Some Maples are a fall digging hazzard (ie Acer rubrum). Others can be transplanted now. Fall is an excellent time for planting, as long as the ground is not frozen. You do not have to worry about transpiration. Just practice good planting principles and you should be ok. I would make sure you thoroughly watered it and add a couple of inches of mulch. Do not put mulch around the collar or "volcano" mulch it.

    www.LenzLandscapeService.com
     
  6. Marcos

    Marcos LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,720

    Horse puckey!
    If your maple's dropped its leaves, it's ready to be moved, period!
     
  7. grasswhacker

    grasswhacker LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,873

    Seasonal Care for Trees and Shrubs
    in Northern U.S. Climates


    Transplanting is defined as: the digging (aka. uprooting) of a plant from one


    Transplanting is defined as: the digging (aka. uprooting) of a plant from one location for the purpose of moving it to a new location. Typically, during this type of move lots of roots are lost.

    Step 1: Things to do before you transplant
    Part 1: Preparing for the Move (.pdf)

    Step 2: How to transplant
    Part 2: Making the Move (.pdf)

    Spring is the best time to transplant softwood species like pine, spruce, fir, hemlock, false cypress, and Atlantic white cedar. Other plants to move in spring include:

    Species to Transplant in Spring
    Almond (Prunus spp.)
    Hawthorn species (Crataegus spp.)
    Oak (Quercus spp.)

    Apricot (Prunus spp.)
    Hawthorn, cockspur (Crataegus crusgalli)
    Pawpaw, common (Asiminia triloba)

    Baldcypress (Taxodium spp.)
    Hemlock (Tsuga spp.)
    Paulownia, royal (Paulownia tomentosa)

    Beech (Fagus spp.)
    Hickory (Carya spp.)
    Peach (Prunus spp.)

    Beech, American (Fagus
    grandifolia)
    Holly, American (Ilex opaca)
    Pear, callery (Pyrus callergana)

    Beech, European (Fagus sylvatica)
    Honeylocust (Gleditsia triacanthos)
    Pecan (Carya spp.)

    Birch (Betula spp.)
    Hornbeam, American (Carpinus caroliniana)
    Persimmon, common (Diospyros virginiana)

    Birch, European white (Betula pendula)
    Hornbeam, European (Carpinus betulus)
    Plum (Prunus spp.)

    Birch, River (Betula nigra)
    Horsechestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum)
    Plum, cherry (Prunus cerasifera)

    Buckeye, Bottlebrush (Aesculus parviflora)
    Horsechestnut, ruby red
    Pine, jack (Pinus
    banksiana)

    Butternut (Juglans spp.)
    Ironwood, American hophornbeam (Ostrya virginiana)
    Pine, pondersoa (Pinus ponderosa)

    Cedar, red (Juniperus virginiana)
    Katsuratree (Cercidiphyllum
    japonicum)
    Poplar (Populus spp.)

    Cherry (Prunus spp.)
    Laburnum (Laburnum spp.)
    Sassafras (Sassafras
    albidum)

    Cotoneaster (Cotoneaster spp.)
    Larch (Larix spp.)
    Silverbell (Halesia spp.)

    Corktree, amur (Phellodendron amurense)
    Larch, golden (Pseudolarix amabilis)
    Sourwood (Oxydendrum arboreum)

    Cypress (Taxodium spp.)
    Linden, silver (Tilia
    tomentosa)
    Sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua)

    Daphne (Daphne spp.)
    Magnolia (Magnolia spp.)
    Tuliptree (Liriodendron tulipifera)

    Dogwood, flowering (Cornus floria)
    Magnolia, Cucumbertree (Magnolia acuminata)
    Tupelo, Black gum, Sour gum (Nyssa sylvatica)

    Ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba)
    Magnolia, southern (Magnolia grandiflora)
    Walnut (Juglans spp.)

    Goldenraintree (Koelreuteria paniculata)
    Maple, paperbark (Acer griseum)
    Walnut, black (Juglans
    nigra)

    False cypress (Chamaecyparis spp.)
    Maple, Red (Acer rubrum)
    Willow (Salix spp.)

    Fir (Abies spp.)
    Maple, sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) Yellowwood (Cladrastis kentukea)

    Fringetree, white (Chionanthus virginicus)
    Maple, trident (Acer buergerianum) Yew (Taxus spp.)
     
  8. Marcos

    Marcos LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,720

    Horse puckey again!
    You apparently spend too much time typing, and not enough time doing!
    I've been involved the nursery business intimately for 2 1/2 decades, and I've dug, hauled, and planted just about every shape, size and color of maple you could think of repeatedly and consistently, every year in the fall!
    'Ortho' Books are fine for guidelines for newbies, Grasswhacker, but in the real world the nurseryman's instincts and experience rule when it comes to digging.
     
  9. grasswhacker

    grasswhacker LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,873

    Here ya go Boy:
    From Rutgers Coopertive and research extension:
    Transplanting Trees andShrubs
    Mark C. Vodak, Ph.D., Extension Specialist in Forestry; Nicholas Polanin, Somerset County Agricultural Agent; and
    Arthur J. Vrecenak, Ph.D., Former Assistant Research Professor in Horticulture
    Deciduous and evergreen trees and shrubs can be moved either in early fall or spring—except for some species such as thebirches, beeches, most oaks, magnolias, andhemlocks. These species should be moved onlyin early spring. Principles and Practice of Plant-ing Trees and Shrubs by Gary B. Watson, and E.B.Himelick, available through the InternationalSociety of Arboriculture, 217-355-9411 or onlineat www.isa-arbor.com.
    It is important to maintain a proper balance be-tween branches and the root system whenever atree or shrub is transplanted. Trees or shrubs thatare to be moved should be prepared for the moveby root pruning for one or two seasons prior to themove. This will concentrate fine root growthwithin the root volume to be moved with the tree.
    How To Dig
    Size of Ball
    Size of the soil ball should vary with size of plant.Root systems of plants differ depending on the typeof soil in which they are growing. Before attemptingto move a tree, remember that 1 cubic foot of soilweighs approximately 110 pounds and a 24-inchsoil ball weighs approximately 390 pounds.For shade trees, measure the diameter of thetree trunk 1 foot above the ground. Dig a ball Transplanting Trees andShrubs
    Mark C. Vodak, Ph.D., Extension Specialist in Forestry; Nicholas Polanin, Somerset County Agricultural Agent; and
    Arthur J. Vrecenak, Ph.D., Former Assistant Research Professor in Horticulture
    Deciduous and evergreen trees and shrubscan be moved either in early fall or spring—except for some species such as thebirches, beeches, most oaks, magnolias, andhemlocks. These species should be moved onlyin early spring. Principles and Practice of Plant-ing Trees and Shrubs by Gary B. Watson, and E.B.Himelick, available through the InternationalSociety of Arboriculture, 217-355-9411 or onlineat www.isa-arbor.com.
    It is important to maintain a proper balance be-tween branches and the root system whenever atree or shrub is transplanted. Trees or shrubs thatare to be moved should be prepared for the moveby root pruning for one or two seasons prior to themove. This will concentrate fine root growthwithin the root volume to be moved with the tree.
    How To Dig
    Size of Ball
    Size of the soil ball should vary with size of plant.Root systems of plants differ depending on the typeof soil in which they are growing. Before attemptingto move a tree, remember that 1 cubic foot of soilweighs approximately 110 pounds and a 24-inchsoil ball weighs approximately 390 pounds.For shade trees, measure the diameter of thetree trunk 1 foot above the ground. Dig a ballTransplanting Trees andShrubs
    Mark C. Vodak, Ph.D., Extension Specialist in Forestry; Nicholas Polanin, Somerset County Agricultural Agent; and
    Arthur J. Vrecenak, Ph.D., Former Assistant Research Professor in Horticulture
     
  10. grasswhacker

    grasswhacker LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,873

    Oh and just to add I've transplanted maples (from nearby woods) and cedars in early spring and they have done great.
     

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