Transplanting Question

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by GravelyGuy, Mar 20, 2008.

  1. GravelyGuy

    GravelyGuy LawnSite Silver Member
    from Indiana
    Posts: 2,517

    I have a customer that is getting a new front porch put on their house and they want me to remove a couple of shrubs for them. There is two ground level junipers and two pine type trees. I'm not sure what they are: fir, spruce, pine, or whatever, but they want them out. They look just like perfect little Christmas trees.

    I'm not really worried about the junipers, but I hate to just hack down these pine trees. They are about 5' or so and the trunk is probably 4-5" in diameter. They said that they are probably 5 years old or so. They are pretty little trees and they look healthy.

    Would I be able to dig these up leaving root ball attached and go plant them someplace else? What precautions should I take?

    Thanks...
     
  2. Mark Bogart

    Mark Bogart LawnSite Member
    Posts: 174

    It can be done. I'm actually going to be transplanting over 40 trees and shrubs in the next few weeks. One thing I did was root prune them last spring in order to reduce transplant shock. With your situation it doesn't sound like you can go this route.
    Can you get a tree spade into the property? If not you'll have to do a lot of digging. If you go with the digging route make sure you have good quality burlap and oversized steel ball cages to hold the ball together. Depending on your soil you'll be dealing with a lot of weight with each tree. Watch your back! Make sure you use a good quality triple phosphate when transplanting these trees. Mix it in with the soil. Good luck and hopefully this helped.
     
  3. GravelyGuy

    GravelyGuy LawnSite Silver Member
    from Indiana
    Posts: 2,517

    Thanks for the info Mark. Yeah, unfortunatley I'm going to just be using a shovel. Any idea how long they can be out of the ground?
     
  4. Mark Bogart

    Mark Bogart LawnSite Member
    Posts: 174

    For me I try to get them into the ground ASAP. This time of the year in my part of Colorado the wind dries things out really quick. If you have to let them set for awhile place a large amount of compost/mulch around the balls to hold in moisture. Nurseries do this with a lot of there B&B stock. Keep the root balls moist. Don't overwater.
     
  5. Mark Bogart

    Mark Bogart LawnSite Member
    Posts: 174

    I would also recommend spraying down the pine trees with Transfilm. This will reduce water loss through the needles.
     
  6. GravelyGuy

    GravelyGuy LawnSite Silver Member
    from Indiana
    Posts: 2,517

    We'll see how it goes. Thanks for the help!
     

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