Tree fungus/mold problem....

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by drumbo, Aug 6, 2007.

  1. drumbo

    drumbo LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 336

    So, this tree seems to have this "sap"-like substance on the leaves and also has a mold/fungus growing. Does anyone have a clue to what it might be?

    IMG.jpg
     
  2. americanlawn

    americanlawn LawnSite Fanatic
    from midwest
    Posts: 5,861

    Sooty mold growing off aphid honeydew on the Tulip tree. Won't harm the tree, but cars parked underneath may not appreciate the sticky spotting.
     
  3. Plant Buyer 83

    Plant Buyer 83 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 176

    Thats exactly what it is. Aphids, particularly Tuliptree aphid, can build up to large numbers leaving deposits of honeydew on lower leaves, cars, and other hard surfaces below. A black, sooty mold starts to grow on the honeydew. Although this does little permanent damage to the tree, the honeydew and sooty mold can be annoying.
     
  4. drumbo

    drumbo LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 336

    And this is exactly why I am a member of these forums! I love you guys!...in a totally straight, non-gay, kinda way.
     
  5. americanlawn

    americanlawn LawnSite Fanatic
    from midwest
    Posts: 5,861

    Ron Paul for President -- good man. I'll be at the Iowa Straw Poll this weekend.......for me, it's a toss-up between him and Huckabee. Anyways....I already know you're a good guy on this site. By the way, the tallest recorded Tulip tree was in southern Indiana. They get a little anthracnose sometimes, (as I suspected from your pic), but they are a very desireable/clean tree.:usflag:
     
  6. vegomatic40

    vegomatic40 LawnSite Senior Member
    from 6
    Posts: 406

    Drumbo...While aphids are certainly likely to be secreting honeydew with the usual sooty mold as a result, don't be to sure they are the cause. Tulip Poplars are also famous for "Tuliptree scale". These insects are very difficult to control and are likely to be in their most susceptible stage (crawlers) at this time. Tuliptree scale produces massive amounts of honeydew as well and are best indentified by looking on the underneath side of the leaves, stems and along the trunk. Do a google search for these guys for a positive ID with pictures. Applying insecticides during their crawler stage is the most effective means of control. Horticultural oil/Superior oils are not effective for this type of scale even at maximum rates.
     
  7. vegomatic40

    vegomatic40 LawnSite Senior Member
    from 6
    Posts: 406

  8. drumbo

    drumbo LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 336

    Thanks for the info Vego...I did see small, white insects on the undersides of the leaves. They almost looked like a residue...so, I'm assuming they are aphids (I am not thoroughly trained in insect ID'ing).
     

Share This Page