Tree Help

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by firecapt13, Mar 3, 2006.

  1. firecapt13

    firecapt13 LawnSite Member
    from NC
    Posts: 96

    I have a customer that has a couple of trees that are dying and she wants me to replace them. They are approx 6-8 feet tall. She dosent know what they are called. They look like a leyland cypress but they have a blue tint to the green. Can anyone help me identify them. I have a call into my nursery waiting to hear from them. any help would be appreciated.
     
  2. sheshovel

    sheshovel LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,112

    got pics?Hard to identify without them..you can always cut one down and take it into the nursery or take in a branch and they should be able to tell you
     
  3. Dreams To Designs

    Dreams To Designs LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,406

    Check out Cupressus arizonica 'Blue Pyramid' or Cupressus arizonica var. glabra 'Blue Ice'. Very similar to Leyland cypress, but with a blue tint or color. Both prefer dry, well drained soil. The Blue pyramid is only hardy from zones 7A to 9A and can be very finicky plant.

    As She Shovel has requested, photos would help. But before you replace them, find out why they are dying? The wrong plant in the wrong place will persist, no matter how many times you replace it. The installation may be at fault, pests or disease, moisture or soil conditions, or simply the type of plant will not be happy there.

    Kirk
     
  4. treedoc1

    treedoc1 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 319

    NAYLOR'S BLUE LEYLAND CYPRESS
    x Cupressocyparis leylandii 'Naylor's Blue'

    attached is a picture of Arizona blue cypress...quite a big difference in foliage from a leyland

    0.7c.jpg
     
  5. sheshovel

    sheshovel LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,112

    True very true.
     
  6. firecapt13

    firecapt13 LawnSite Member
    from NC
    Posts: 96

    she is a new customer of mine. she said she had a coluple of other trees in past replaced and that the burlap and wire around root ball were not cut. i am guessing the got rootbound. i will try to get pics next couple of days. i am also planning on taking a branch to my nursery thank you
     
  7. Dreams To Designs

    Dreams To Designs LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,406

    How about, Chamaecyparis lawsoniana v.'pelts blue' or one of the other bluer lawson cypresses?

    I believe Doc would be correct if it looks exactly like a leyland and is blue, it will be x Cupressocyparis leylandii 'Naylor's Blue'. The Naylors Blue do not do well here on the edge of zones 7A & 6B and are unfortunately often sold but very short lived. Perhaps due to being large and B&B which is typically more difficult for leylands to recover from with their root system.

    Tree Doc, do Naylors do well in your area and where would that be?

    Kirk
     
  8. treedoc1

    treedoc1 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 319

    DC metro area they do as well as a regular leyland.

    firecapt13 , burlap and metal baskets are way down on the list of why a plant/tree will die. Non-synthetic burlap rots, wire baskets have almost a 3-4" square mesh...quite a long time for a root to grow that large in diameter.

    Careless handling on tall evergreens leads to more cracking of the rootball, with or without a basket. Also check the planting depth and drainage...that is likely the #1 culprit of death.

    As far as the variety...all the other suggestions are not quite in the mainstream of nursery stock. Most are first grown in Oregon and freighted in to local nurseries. Your location being NC...more than likely a leyland. Plenty of places online to look for your plants. A good one is http://oregonstate.edu/dept/ldplants/
     
  9. amvega

    amvega LawnSite Member
    Posts: 61

    They may be a Wichita Blue, that is in the cypress family. Is it more in a pyramid shape?
     
  10. nocutting

    nocutting LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 530

    Several booksare avalible by Lyons, Johnson & Dirr.......thats where I'd put my money?:drinkup: :usflag:
     

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