tree problem

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by vaacutabove, Mar 24, 2012.

  1. vaacutabove

    vaacutabove LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,006

    He is not going to like it but what can u do i knew enough to know i had a big problem guess ill ne pulling and planting a tree soon. Should i spray the other trees just to make sure
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  2. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,298

    This is an example of a canker on apple, which can be caused by a variety of organisms.

    [​IMG]

    This is typically what you will see with a canker type disease, a sunken lesion.

    What is shown in the pic by the OP is either hardened sap from wounds (insect or otherwise) or galls, likely the latter given the linked doc by TH.
     
  3. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,298

    If you are certain it is black knot, then read the extension bulletin that was linked.
     
  4. ted putnam

    ted putnam LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,531


    As usual, you are correct, I knew it was gall not canker. I just typed it before I thought. It is gall of some sort of which I was not sure. Others are familiar with it. It is much more than "sap". It is scar tissue the tree has formed in an effort to isolate the problem.

    As said before, a single prune at the base of the tree will solve the problem in that tree. I do recommend reading up on what can be done to prevent it on similar trees on that property.
     
  5. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,298

  6. vaacutabove

    vaacutabove LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,006

    So its a cut it down
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  7. ted putnam

    ted putnam LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,531


    IMO, it would either be that or a severe pruning depending on how extensive the damage is. If the cause is insect, you may very well eliminate it from the tree and with regular spraying, prevent future damage. If the cause is fungal, you may just be prolonging a slow, painful death. If you decide to go the pruning route, be sure to disinfect cutting equipment with a 5% solution of bleach/water after each cut. I have not investigated what you have there but heritage and hokie seemed sure it was this "black knot". Read up and see what the cause of this is and this along with consultation with your customer may help you make your decision. Either way, burn the remnants to help prevent spread of the problem. Good Luck
     
  8. zerocross

    zerocross LawnSite Member
    Posts: 5

    systemic fungicide through root zone injection and keep fertility up until tree dies which it will do!
     
  9. vaacutabove

    vaacutabove LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,006

    Thanks the tree was pulled and the other one was cut out by hand thanks for the help
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  10. baseballfan42093

    baseballfan42093 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 11

    That's definitely black knot fungus.
    You shouldn't need to take the whole tree, just cut off the infected areas and spray on some delta or echo (not the small engines!) fungicide. Take the limbs you cut off and bury them or burn them so you can prevent further spreading of the spores, and make sure to clean your tools! Don't need to be spreading that yourself...
     

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