Tremor

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by lawrence stone, Oct 31, 2001.

  1. Tell the bigwigs upstairs that the hot mix next season will be
    5-10-31 with 2% iron and pre-M.
     
  2. osc

    osc LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 502

    Now I really feel stupid. WWW.IDON'TGETIT.COM

    With that analysis, are you trying to germinate seed? 'cause that's basically starter fert with Iron. 'course, you won't start seed with pre-M.
     
  3. Ric

    Ric LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,957

    Lawrence


    I love K and use it as high as 1-3 with great response but I believe a 1-6 oxide 1-5 elemental is a waste of money and will leach out. also high K will knock the N and it will leach. On warm season truf we get a nice bluegreen color with 1-3 and even 1-2.
    with out excessive top growth. Studies have shown that 2-1 is the most cost effect blend however 1-1 is a great way to go. LOL

    Ric
    I can't spellllll but 2+2=5
     
  4. thelawnguy

    thelawnguy LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,412

    How else would you be able to keep an unwatered postage stamp deep green and manageable on a 10-day mowing schedule?
     
  5. tremor

    tremor LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,476

    Good Morning,

    I'll work up a price for a custom. If you take 880 bags, we'll make anything that works. I think the fert you're talking about is:
    -------------------------------------------------
    5-10-31 10% FE SKU# 016475 to which add .86 Pre-M

    I'll call it in today. I like it.

    12,000 sq @ 1.5lb/AI/A so 1.25lbs K ..hmmmm...
    -------------------------------------------------
    You ever seen the 19-0-19 50%ppscu 1.31% Pre-M ?

    It was formulated for golf fairways. I sell a fair amount to ball park managers who are cutting with a reel because it's a mini prill. The point here is, to get 1.5 lbs Pre-M, you apply 2.64lbs/M so the N & K work out to .5lbs each. Problem here is no iron.

    There's also a 5-10-20 .86 Pre-M but no FE either.

    I'll post again laterr
    Steve
     
  6. fireball

    fireball LawnSite Member
    from ne Pa
    Posts: 172

    lets see, if you mix the yellow stain of pre-m with the brown stain of iron do you get a blue stain?
     
  7. Stone, (no I ain't calling you Mr. Stone) I love that blend idea. I used something similar to to that this spring and loved it. Less growth and a good dark green color. Plus finaly got the Dimention out at the proper dose.

    For one most MFG's put way to much Nitro in their fert for use with pre em's and it makes it hard to keep up with mowing in the spring. Or we can be like TG/CL, but who wants that to put up with.
     
  8. That's fine is that a regular production run?

    The iron is just a band aid anyway.
     
  9. Pacific Nursery

    Pacific Nursery LawnSite Member
    Posts: 114

    So you guys are telling me that this mix (or one like it) will give the lawns a better green up next spring with less uncontrolled growth? The analysis looks right (is K high?). If you fed high N in the fall then there should be enough N left over through spring.

    Tremor, do you like this mix for the midwest and do you reccomend it over say 19-0-6 pre-m normally scheduled in spring?

    LGF, I'm in your neck of the woods, what do you think?
     
  10. tremor

    tremor LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,476

    I had my guy run the numbers on this stuff today.
    This much K (last number) probably wouldn't be a problem anywhere that you don't allready know that Potash is too high. K has little to do with color. It is a transient element that influences respiration, transiration (drought tolerance), rooting, carbohydrate and amino-acid synthesis. Turf treated with large quantities of potassium will be more "durable", in that cells walls will be somewhat thicker. Being transient, potash stimulates enzymatic processes with out becoming an actual part of the plant. Like Nitrogen, potash can leach and is used by grasses in much larger quantities than Phosphorous thus the need for larger applied quantities & frequency.
    There are a lot of Potash sources, but the 2 most likely to be found in commercial turf fertilizers are Potassium Chloride (KCL) and Potassium Sulphate (K2So4). Chloride is fine for cool, wet weather use (higher salt index) and Sulphate is used during the summer (lower salt index).
    The 5-10-31 10% Iron (custom) & the 5-10-20 (stocking) are both KCL based, but can be made either way or as a blend of the two.

    Now for my dilema. This isn't my forum so posting a sales pitch with pricing would be in really poor taste. Plus I'll guese that a lot of the folks reading are allready customers, but probably not my customers. Also, freight & registration cost issues come to mind. NJ as a for instance requires us to $250.00 per year for each item we register with a minimum of 3 years or $750.00. Thats $1.00 per bag on an 800 bag order. Most states aren't that bad, but add in freight, and you can see why posting the price would be uncool.
    Plus I'm sure some of our competitors surf around just as much as me so.....
    I'll send Stone a private E-Mail with the information that he and I will need from each other.
    If anyone else want this info, please send me a private e-mail. I'll need your account number if you're a customer, and your address with state if you're not.
    Gotta run,
    Steve

    sls247@lesco.com

    PS If the moderators thinks I'm on the line will they drop me a message?
     

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