Trouble Getting Past Air Cooled Motor

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing Equipment' started by MBDiagMan, Aug 23, 2013.

  1. MBDiagMan

    MBDiagMan LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 852

    I found a mower that I can get for reasonable money, although it needs some TLC. Problem is that I have gotten so spoiled with my liquid cooled Kaw, that I am having trouble getting past the Grasshopper having an air cooled engine.

    It's hell for noisy, and I suppose I can get used to that, but I'm having trouble pulling the trigger.

    The mower in question is a Grasshopper 725K2, 61", with dump from seat grass collection system. It only has 253 hours. It is a 25HP Kohler Command horizontal shaft, and seems to run strong and well.

    I know that there were some particular Kohler engine families that were problem ridden and I don't think this is one of them.

    I appreciate your thoughts.
    Larry
     
  2. MBDiagMan

    MBDiagMan LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 852

    No one with any advantages and disadvantages of an air cooled vs. liquid cooled?
     
  3. puppypaws

    puppypaws LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 8,872

    You've had very good luck with liquid cooled, so there is no arguing that point.

    I have enough liquid cooled equipment to keep maintained and have never been interested in owning a L/C engine on a mower. I never worry about radiators becoming clogged or needing to be cleaned, I never worry about water pumps, hoses, or making sure everything in the system is winterized. The only thing I find necessary on A/C mowers is blow out the oil coolers when it crosses my mind. I never think about the cooling components, I crank the mower and go about business, when I'm finished, I switch it off and go about something else.

    I had a new (0 hrs.) mower with a diesel engine brought to me as a demo, I ran the mower a very short period of time when all of a sudden the engine slow down to idle rpms, I looked down and the hot warning light was on. I immediately got off the mower and looked behind the seat at the radiator screen, and it was completely covered in trash. I was then forced to go get a handheld blower and clean the radiator screen, while I was in the process I said to myself, "now you see why I will never own a L/C mower."

    This is one experience, but it was one that stuck in my mind, and the reason the only way you could give me a L/C mower would be if I could sell it immediately.
     
  4. djagusch

    djagusch LawnSite Platinum Member
    from MN
    Posts: 4,203

    The l/c advantages are what you stated. Quiet, little better on fuel (as the temp is maintained vs changing on a/c), and you know when it is getting hot.

    For a/c if you have employees you don't care about the noise and don't worry about a clogged radiator not being checked. On a/c my biggest worry is cooking the engine and not knowing about it. A/c engines tend to have more gasket seeping oil than l/c because the operator can't tell when it gets too hot.

    Speaking of the radiator only time I worry about clogging is cutting 12" dry grass. Regular mowing its never a issue.
     
  5. mag360

    mag360 LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,446

  6. MBDiagMan

    MBDiagMan LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 852

    Thanks for the responses. You state your cases very well.

    When I bought my Bad Boy 8 years ago, I thought the LC would be the thing to have, but since then I have thought that I would have been as well served with an AC. If I were in a formal debate with you guys, about the only legitimate point I would be able to come up with in favor of LC would be that it is quiet.

    I lost so much of my hearing while in the Army, they wanted me to take a partial disability for it when I got out. I would not take it. Since that time, my hearing has gotten much worse. You would think that someone with poor hearing wouldn't care if something is noisy, but many noises in certain frequency ranges are quite annoying. I would be running this mower myself most of the time. Everything else about the machine is what I am looking for. I think that the solution is a Worktunes ear protection headset.

    Thanks again for your comments,
    Larry
     
  7. MBDiagMan

    MBDiagMan LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 852

    Well, I got past the air cooled issue and got the mower back to my shop yesterday. It was kept looking very nice by the original owner and kept out of the weather. He changed oil frequently and the machine looks outstanding.

    It appears that he did not know that there were grease fittings on the spindles. Everything else has been kept well lubricated, but the deck sounded like a thrashing machine. Two of the spindles wouldn't even take grease the fittings were so rusted up.

    It runs great and the drive system is flawless, that's the good news.

    I got the spindles taken care of now, and changed the oil, oil and air filters and replaced a few sheaves that felt rough. I expect to finish it up tonight and run it.

    I am putting less into it to get it up in shape than I planned on, so it's turning out to be even more of a bargain than I thought.

    Now, let's see how long it takes for me to get used to that noisy air cooled engine.

    Larry
     
  8. puppypaws

    puppypaws LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 8,872

    Wear this as I do and you want find the engine noise a nuisance.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. djagusch

    djagusch LawnSite Platinum Member
    from MN
    Posts: 4,203

    They still have a tinging noise to them.
     
  10. MBDiagMan

    MBDiagMan LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 852

    I have already been meaning to go by and pick up a Work Tunes. I bought one about 10 or 12 years ago, but stopped wearing it when I got my Bad Boy. I also got a new tractor that is not nearly as loud as my old one, so I stopped wearing it while on my tractor too.

    From the picture, the LCD display makes me think that they have upgraded them since then.

    I also have another trick up my sleeve. The outlet of the muffler on the mower has been changed a little. I am going to find a turn out for it and face it rearward to direct the noise away from the "cockpit."

    Thanks for the suggestion. It's a good one.
    Larry
     

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