Trying to differentiate between Poa Annua and Fescue Seed Heads

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by maverick214, May 19, 2004.

  1. maverick214

    maverick214 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 10

    Hi all. I have a fescue lawn in Wilmington, DE and I am trying to determine if all the seed heads that have popped up in my lawn over the past 2 weeks is Fescue seed heads or Annual Bluegrass. Are there any distinguishable features? Also, what is the likelihood that Poa Annua could have infested approximately 75% of a sodded lawn that was laid about 1 year ago?

    Your thoughts are greatly appreciated.

    Thanks.

    -Maverick
     
  2. Shady Brook

    Shady Brook LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Indiana
    Posts: 1,517

    You might try posting this question in the application forum. I had a question pertaining too differenciating Creeping bent from POA Anua, and POA Triv. Likely you will have to take a sample to an expert, or go through a detailed evaluation with a magnifier, and some online resources.

    I don't think a bluegrass lawn would be domiated in that period of time, but I am no expert.

    Jay
     
  3. maverick214

    maverick214 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 10

    Anyone else have any more thoughts on this?
     
  4. ThreeWide

    ThreeWide LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,116

    Annual Bluegrass will develop seedheads at a relatively low height. Often you can have fescue cut at 3" and still have poa annua seedheads beneath. The seedheads are a very "white" color.

    I've seen new sod infested with poa annua many times. If preemergent was not applied to the sod, no surprise that happened.

    poa.jpg
     
  5. maverick214

    maverick214 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 10

    Thanks for the image. No pre-emergent was applied but many of the surrounding houses did not have a pre-emergent laid down either and they are seedhead free. What kind of grass is that around the Poa Annua? Also, I went to the Lesco shop by my house and the representative said that it can possibly be the seedheads of the actual fescue grass that was originally laid down as sod. How accurate is that statement?

    Your thoughts are greatly appreciated.

    Maverick
     
  6. ThreeWide

    ThreeWide LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,116

    If you supply a photo or two, I'm sure the gallery here could give you the answer.

    Kind of hard to say without seeing it. But poa annua is very distinguishable under any circumstance.
     
  7. sgoalie23

    sgoalie23 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 195

    Gentlemen,
    The annual blue (ab) in your neck of the woods should now be turning brown due to the temperature climbing above 70F. You can also tell if it is ab by pulling out a clump. The roots are not deep as will be with fescue. The roots of the ab are extremely shallow. The other problem is when you mow, you may be your own worst enemy by carrying the seeds from lawn to lawn. The present school of thought is that a good pre-emergent should be applied during the summer/fall transition period. The seeds will germinate when the temperature starts to fall below 70/65F. The suggestion to go to the fert. application forum is an excellent. There, you will discover numerous threads on the subject along with informative links, such as, Perdue University. I hopes this helps. Sgoalie23's father, Mark.
     
  8. maverick214

    maverick214 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 10

    Thanks for the great feedback thus far. I will post pictures shortly.

    Maverick
     
  9. maverick214

    maverick214 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 10

    Ok here is three pictures of my lawn. Take a look and tell me if I'm doomed.

    Pic 1

    Pic 2

    Pic 3

    Your thoughts.

    -Maverick
     
  10. ThreeWide

    ThreeWide LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,116

    Looks like Poa Annua from those pictures.

    I'm taking a quick stab at this, but I think Acclaim Extra would be a viable method of killing Poa Annua with no issues with your fescue.
     

Share This Page